Mo's Cattle Panel Hoop Coops

By Molpet · Nov 29, 2017 · ·
Rating:
5/5,
  1. Molpet
    I have made several Cattle Panel hoops coops and am making a 4th. I will attempt to document this 8x8 as I go along.
    They are loosely based on Chook-A-Holics https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/permanent-hoop-coop-guide.47818/ but I used 2x4's and added 2x4 field wire over the 1/2" hardware cloth, instead of electric fencing.
    But here are some pics of some I have made:
    The first one is a 8'x 24' and I thought it would be big enough FOREVER!! when I built it over the winter 2015-2016. I finished it March 2016 and it had 8 chickens in it. I have a purple used coop and a old wooden dog house that are used as Huddle boxes for molters, nest boxes and a place for broodies to raise young.
    South end in spring
    coop 3-21-16.JPG

    and in Winter, with turkeys and 26 chickens ..the south end is completely open for ventilation.. the 2nd, a 8'x8', is visible to the left, the turkeys were supposed to live in it but they had other ideas.

    KIMG0005 (1).JPG

    I had to divide the coop in half because the turkeys harassed the chickens..
    KIMG0006 (2).JPG KIMG0007 (1).JPG

    looking at the big coop from the north west. The apron that is 1/2' hardware cloth is visible..The structure the egg basket is hanging from is not part of the hoop coop... it was existing.
    KIMG0132.JPG

    North end of 8x8' coop
    in summer when the turkeys still lived in it.
    KIMG0004.JPG

    and in winter
    KIMG0001 (6).JPG

    and now for the new coop
    It is not being built on level ground. As you can see it is leaning a bit to the west...
    In this shot you can see how the base is configured and the panels go inside the base on mine... other people put them on the outside... I build the base, stick one end of the panel in the base , lift the other end and walk it up and bend it so I can stick the other end in the base... no pics I am doing this by myself.
    KIMG0030_01 (2).JPG

    Well I took pics today, computer said it downloaded 27 and I deleted off the phone.. this is the only two I could open .. shows the cattle panel cut to fit around the 2x4 and a additional support I added to this coop .. because I plan on moving it as a tractor.
    KIMG0035_01.JPG

    KIMG0036_01.JPG

    end supports and some HC attached to wood
    KIMG0052_02.JPG

    cutting off the extra HC wrapped around from the front .. some people do this after the HC is on the cP's.. I like to do it first and have the HC that goes over the hoop hold it down
    KIMG0071_01.JPG

    you can sorta see the extra is cut off so it covers the first square of the CP.. then cut at the curve so it lays flat. wire ties hold it down temporarily.. later the HC over the hoop and hog rings will hold it down.
    KIMG0073_01.JPG

    photo out of order, but cut the ends of the base so I can drag it with out digging in
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    door detail of another coop
    KIMG0069_01.JPG

    The CP rests on screws w/washers 1" up from the bottom of the base.. just to hold them up
    I use plumber strap to connect the CP and HW to the frame instead of staples.. too hard for me to hammer... I did use screw and washers, but kept dropping the screws.
    KIMG0076_02.JPG

    on the coops w/one door I shove a 2x4 between the cp squares..I have a screw sticking out the bottom each end that holds the board from sliding out
    KIMG0077_02.JPG

    more pics to come

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Recent User Reviews

  1. Hanika
    "Large coop on a little budget"
    5/5, 5 out of 5, reviewed Jul 31, 2018
    I can't wait to build one of my own. My flock is about to double in size and I am needing more room, this is perfect. I really appreciate how you simplified your documentation and I don't have to fire up the flux cappacitor to start construction. This design is totally customizable and can be modified to house and protect anything, not to mention expandable. Once the frame is built and cattle pannels installed it could be more permanent with a concrete slab poured into the base frame. This style of coop can be built on any budget, make it as simple or as extravagant as you want.
  2. henaynei
    "Building my first CP coop as we "speak""
    5/5, 5 out of 5, reviewed Jun 18, 2018
    Moving the majority of my flock to my neighbor's yard. Coop is a temp structure that can be broken down and moved as neither she nor I can move the more permanent versions on the hilly and very uneven terrain where we live.
    However, even so your article was very informative and full of ideas. Some to be incorporated now and some in the future!
    Thank you for taking the time to put together such a good piece!
    Smuvers Farm likes this.
  3. GentryGentleFeatherFarm
    ""
    5/5, 5 out of 5, reviewed Jun 12, 2018
    :weethat is awesome!!!:thumbsup

Comments

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  1. rjohns39
    Great Job Mo!
  2. 21hens-incharge
    I really like the way these work. Well done documenting it.
    I know many many people can use this info, myself included.
    :thumbsup
  3. Smuvers Farm
    Awesome additional pics Mo! Very helpful..
  4. CapricornFarm
    I love your builds! Mine is on a sloping surface as well, the bedding ends up all at the end so i keep putting more in!
      Molpet likes this.
  5. Smuvers Farm
    I'm trying not to be dense, but wouldn't you need 4, 8' 2x4s for the base?
    1. Molpet
      The cattle panels are 50" so if you use a 8x8 base 4"will hang over.. which is ok too... I got 12' cheaper in the bargain pile cheaper than full price 8'
      Smuvers Farm likes this.
    2. Molpet
      The big coop has the overhang... On the south
      sevenpines and Smuvers Farm like this.
  6. Dayrel
    Question- So, if I understand correctly, you are using cattle panels covered by hardware cloth, covered by 2x4" field wire fencing, correct? What is the advantage of the final layer?
    1. Molpet
      correct.. the field fencing is because I am paranoid about predators LOL... I am sure a dog, coon, or cougar can't get through it.. a bear probably could.. the HC keeps the weasels out and most people feel HC is enough.. so for my peace of mind I spent the extra $
      Smuvers Farm likes this.
    2. Dayrel
      Makes sense. The largest I need to worry about here are raccoons, so I'll stop at HC.
      Molpet likes this.
  7. N F C
    Looks like your new one is coming along! What would you estimate your total cost was for the finished one?
    1. Molpet
      well here is a guess off the top of my head.. $300
      for an 8x8ish everything bought on sale.. Lumber was at Home depot 70% off pile ...so for ends, support and doors I just cut up what I could get cheep! I will keep track this time around. So the break down may change.

      2 pressure treated 8' 2x4 $1 =$2
      10 pressure treated 12' 2x4 $1:50 = $15

      ETA 2 cattle panels $15=$30
      2 rolls 48"x 50 Hardware cloth, don't use it all. $54 a roll = $108
      1 roll 24"x50 Hardware Cloth for apron. $30
      1 roll 2"x 4" 6' tall x 50' field fencing.$50

      hog rings to connect wire $15

      Correct items and cost will be documented in article later
      Hanika, sevenpines and N F C like this.
  8. Smuvers Farm
    Needed these pics.... especially the starter pic. Was trying to figure out how to install door framing! May I ask, the top through beam, is it needed for stability or something?
    1. View previous replies...
    2. Molpet
      I will take measurements tomorrow.... I take my time... the time consuming part is connecting the wire to each other... working a couple hours a day it took me 20-30 hrs
      Dayrel and Smuvers Farm like this.
    3. Smuvers Farm
      lol Thanks sweetie. Just yanking your chain...mostly... :D
      Molpet likes this.
    4. Dayrel
      Both the door frames and the upper bar helps provide stability. They also help to provide an even shape to the structure. You can see that the structure is somewhat lopsided in one picture because the wooden structure is not yet complete. Finally, it also provides a handy place to hang things like lights, hanging food/water dishes, etc.

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