My Flock

Gallery may include some birds I no longer own as well.
I never really showed off my chickens! With our new rope lightning instead of a bulb you can actually see inside my coop. But here's the rundown: Wheaten Ameraucanas, standard and bantam Buckeyes, d'Anvers of various colors, LF Welsummers, Cornish, Orloffs, Chanteclers, Anconas, Sicilian Buttercup, and Ameraucana rooster/Dominique hen EE. I think. And white Call ducks. And Greys. And blue fawn. And black Runners. And blue Wyandotte bantams.
Mainly though, it’s Anconas, bantam Buckeyes, and d’Anvers.
This isn’t a comprehensive list! There are many young birds-and some adults too-which I have failed to include. I have over 200 birdsincluded the most noteworthy, however. Hopefully it will be interesting.
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Luna, lavender splash d'Anvers hen.
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Ashe, blue Silkie hen. These Silkies lie on the ground in the coop. THEY DO NOT ROOST!
This Silkie somehow got locked in a cage and forgotten about for eight days without food and water and survived. (With a little frantic help.) Everyone had just thought something had got her. That was months ago. Despite them not being right in the head, they must survive stuff pretty well. I had almost thought there was one less of these things to worry about. Moral of the story: problems come back to you if you let them solve themselves. They won't. At least she's the better looking one.
Unfortunately, she is now named Black Hairy.
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Hairy, a partridge Silkie hen. Once called Bobber. She is the original Hairy. Once, a younger cousin came over and named her Hairy. A younger brother named the rest of them Hairy as well. Now they are the Hairies.
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New picture of Starling, Buckeye chick (sold), and Freckles, (died) the half d'Anver (father) Zealand, Dominique bantam (mother)
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Next generation of Buckeyes!
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Some Calls.
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Eeeeeeeee, Welsummer over Ameraucana.
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Reese, Sicilian Buttercup bantam hen.
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Bebes! Call Ducklings, Buckeyes, bbs bantam Wyandottes.

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Impasta. She is an imposter. Sometimes you think she is a d'Anvers, sometimes a Dominique. We think that Freckles the half d'Anvers half Dominique may be her mom, and her dad the single factor cuckoo. Either way, she's probably a better example of a d'Anvers than the black pullets.
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Iggy, Buckeye hen. (The one not dust bathing.)
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Awful photo of a pair of blue Wyandotte bantams. Male is deceased. Hen is named Linda.
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BlueWheat, a blue wheaten Ameraucana pullet and Eeeee the EE hen who is her half sister.
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Marbles, Ancona hen.
She has a cute floppy comb and an interesting personality; she always looks at you with curiosity.
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Reese, a Sicilian Buttercup bantam hen.
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Big Mama, wheaten Ameraucana hen with enormous pupils, now with all of her feathers intact.
Also some Buckeye butts.
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Holly, a black silkie hen who was unfortunately renamed “Black Hairy Jr.”
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Hotshot, quail d’Anvers cock, Diamond, blue quail d’Anvers hen, Sally, quail hen.
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Hotshot is simply adorable and one of the sweetest boys I know. He’s very photogenic and is hypnotized easily.
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Bantam Buckeye hen, then pullet.
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Diamond striking a pose. She does that sometimes. Judges like it.
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Bantam Buckeye hen, again, this time at a show. Photos don’t do the shininess of these birds justice.
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Bantam Buckeyes wrapped in towels after a wash, they were prepared for the Ohio Nationals.
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Ziggy, a cuckoo d’Anvers hen. She’s friendly and has comically short legs. I like her. It’s also funny when she puffs up and fights with other hens, even when she’s going to lose.
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Guineas. They’re okay. They kinda hang around the edges of everything and squawk. 1 Pearl and 3 Lavenders.
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Anconas. Left to right: Mr. Baloney, a cock, Marbles, Atlanta, and Pacifica, some hens.
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D’Anvers, left to right, top to bottom: Bubbles, splash cock, Bluebell a short-legged, crazy eyed blue hen, Sylvia a (very dark) blue hen, Henrietta, a black hen. Strangely, not named for her status as a hen, rather, named after a Henry we got her from.
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LF Buckeye chick. It just looked really derpy.
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Ripple, an old pic of him. He is a splash d’Anvers cockerel, though the spots didn’t manifest. He’s very friendly and enjoying rides on arms.
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Three cuckoo d’Anvers boys. They came out of a sexlinked cross between Ziggy and a black d’Anvers cockerel Percival.
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Ancona chicks. I just liked the picture. They look stylish.
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Ripple. Another outdated pic. He’s three months old now.
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Praline, blue quail D’Anvers pullet. She’s got potential. She’s four months old now. Again outdated.
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Starling.
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Splash d’Anvers chick. Looked cute.
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Lavender guinea keet.

Spoiler: Chicken pics
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Buna, also known as Full Lune. Luna’s daughter, presumably.
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Pineapple, a Russian Orloff pullet.
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Starling and Chub Chub, an Easter Egger hen and a Buckeye hen.
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Luna, self blue d’Anvers hen.
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Tiger, a classic tabby girl kitty, and some Call ducklings.
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Stripey boy, a d’Anvers cockerel.
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Blue and splash d’Anvers chicks.
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Blue d’Anvers chick with Osteospermum daisies.
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Sheep belong in flocks too! Our pet Babydoll Southdown sheep. Two young wethers, Mr. Wooly and Domino.

~Special paragraph designated for Zealand, a Dominique bantam hen who died at age three.~
Zealand is that Dominique bantam hen who hatched Starling. Let's find out how. /At sunset one August night, a couple Dominiques, an Australorp, and a Faverolles were plotting, all female. They hatched a plan, hoping to hatch eggs. Sneaking into a chick delivery box with fake straw, seeming much like a nesting box, they layed their eggs. Zealand decided to take it under herself to hatch these chicks, and meanwhile, another Faverolles was sitting on eggs that we gave her that had a fifty percent chance of being pure. But Zealand's eggs were not. Weeks passed by. Somehow, none of my family had noticed she was missing every night, but we had just assumed she wasn't, because we saw her every day when she came out. For five days we were on vacation, so Zealand had to forage for herself, no food outside the coop. (We lock the coop when we're gone.) Four days before the hatch of the eggs, I FINALLY NOTICED SHE DIDN'T GO IN AT NIGHT. It took two days of spying on her to discover where her nest was, because she would loiter for hours, almost making me think she didn't have a nest, but she kept puffing herself up like a broody. I candled her eggs, and they looked old, so I didn't think they would hatch. But they did, over the course of a week. We got rid of most of the chicks, because of them being crossbred, but I managed to keep the one that looked like a quail d'Anver, since I am interested in genetics, and could study it's parentage. Turned out to be that Easter Egger I mentioned. Actually, now she's among our prettiest hens. Anyhow, we got rid of the Faverolles who had hatched a pure Buckeye we wanted to keep, so we gave it to Zealand, and at first it was hesitant, but Zealand didn't mind, and it now acts like it never had a different mother. Some died, some we got rid of, so the chick we have left is Starling. Anyways, Zealand is the best mother ever, excellent at teaching her chicks how to dust bathe and stuff.
Zealand is the only remaining original hen on this property.
Pictures!

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Luna the d'Anvers hen tried to do the same thing in the garden, and we assumed she was dead, until she was watered by a gardening hose. She was unsuccessful, because she wouldn't allow us to move the nest, so we got rid of the eggs and covered the nesting spot for a while because she lost some weight from nesting so long.
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Shiloh, he's the inspirational avatar cat.
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Rest in Peace, sweet Turkey. You were my favorite bird.
About author
Amer
Hi, this is Amer! If you are reading this, and it says “Member Page” in the title, you probably have read an article that is incomplete, irrelevant, or outdated. Unless, of course, this is an article I specifically linked on a thread. Then it might contain relevant information.

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I remember some of these stories as they were happening. :D
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Gorgeous mixed flock!

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Great article on your beautiful flock. Well now I know that I can go on vacation for a week and know my chickens will be ok, should they run out of food or water before I return...just kidding.
 

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