The Comedihens New Coop

By LoriL, Sep 25, 2012 | | |
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  1. LoriL
    After keeping our three hens in a small chicken tractor for their first year, it was time to commit to building a more permanent home. Like everyone else here, we browsed and browsed some more, until we found a model we thought we could replicate fairly easily and inexpensively. Citygirlinthecountry's Blue Coop was our inspiration. Using our vacation last week, we put this together with a combination of scrap lumber and purchased items, for less than $100 total.[​IMG][​IMG]

    Basically, we built a table and covered it with a scrap of formica ($4), framed up walls out of 2x2 lumber ($15), sided it using 2 sheets of preprimed siding from the damaged freight store ($30) and covered it with a corrugated 4x8 plastic panel ($8). Then I trimmed it out using lathe strips ($7) and caulked everywhere. Window screen layered with hardware cloth covers the vents. When the coop takes its permanent location beside the house, the chicken door will open into attached runs (which are under construction this week). It took just one day before the girls signaled their approval with fresh eggs in the nesting boxes.

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    We did not aim for perfection, but the end results are more than satisfying to all of us. Thanks for looking, and thanks to everyone else who has shared their ideas with us!

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  1. LoriL
    We built it in 4 days. First day, built the base and glued the formica floor. Second day, built the frames for the walls and doors. Third day-siding, trim, roof and nesting boxes. Last day, caulked and painted. It took me longer to look at all the coops here, and to decide which style we could do the easiest!
  2. Tammy N
    I like it how long did it take you to build one like this My Niece wants a smaller model coop and only 2 hens ,so i enjoy the work and looking thanks for showing us .
  3. LoriL
    I put pine shavings on top of the floor, so the chickens seem to move just fine on it. And yes, it is easy to clean! It took me a while to figure out how to seal the edges of the roof panels to keep bugs out, and I finally sprayed expanding foam in the holes and used a serrated knife to cut it flat after it had cured, then caulked and painted it.
  4. hangartnerchix
    Oooh - love the formica idea! That must be super easy to clean! Do you find your chickens have a good footing on it?
  5. bubblehead
    Now this is my kind of construction, mainly the materials.
    I really like the roof idea.

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