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1st time hatching

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Phunter14, Apr 2, 2015.

  1. Phunter14

    Phunter14 Out Of The Brooder

    16
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    Apr 2, 2015
    Hi y'all,
    I set 25 eggs on March 15th in a still air incubator so they would hatch on Easter Day. Here we are on day 19 and I've read so many different things on "lock down" procedures.
    I have a FEW questions.
    1. What should my temperature read?
    2. How much humidity should be in there?
    3. After chicks hatch (if they do) do I need to change any of the heat or humidity settings?
    4. After chicks hatch do I leave them in the incubator? For how long?
    5. Is it okay to open the incubator after some of the chicks hatch or will that ruin the others hatching progress?
    6. How long do I let remaining eggs sit before calling it quits? Till the 24th day?
    Thanks for any advice.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2015
  2. Tolbunt

    Tolbunt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 18, 2015
    Instructions
    • Step 1. Put water on the bottom of the incubator (be careful there are holes that indicate that you are filling it up too high) also place egg turner into incubator.
    • Step 2. Watch incubators temperature and humidity make sure the temp doesn’t go above 101 degrees. The humidity can’t go above 40- 50 percent.
    • Step 3. Put on gloves and put eggs onto the egg turner. Throw away the gloves. (The oils on our hands clog the air sockets and can suffocate potential chicks.)
    • Step 4. Put the cover on too!
    • Step 5. After one week in the incubator put your gloves on and look at the eggs. You are going to be candling the eggs.
    • Step 6. Put the flash light up to the egg and check for veining. If there is no veining then throw away the eggs.
    • Step 7. Repeat step 4 for two weeks.
    • Step 8. Don’t handle the chick too much.
    • Step 9. Let it fluff out and call for its brethren.
    • Step 10. Let the chick be in there for one day and then take the box and put shredded paper or shavings on the bottom.
    • Step 11. Make chick mash by filling up the sample cup with chick starter and add water to it then take the other cup and fill it up with water.
    Tips and warnings
    • Do not eat the eggs that have been in the incubator.
    • Try to avoid setting poopy eggs.
    • Only let the eggs sit outside the incubator for one week at max
    • Chicks need clean water and food about twice a day (morning and night)
    • Once two weeks old you could let the chicks out on sunny days as long as they are watched by you and also upgrade the feeder and waterer
    • Once fully feathered the chicks can be put into a coop. Once feathered upgrade the feeder and waterer again.
    Good luck
     
  3. AmyLynn2374

    AmyLynn2374 Humidity Queen

    15,015
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    Oct 11, 2014
    Gouverneur, NY
    Hi there!!
    1) Still air you should be running at 101-102. Some people do lower it a degree. A good share of us do not.
    2) Humidity has no set number. It should be at least 65% for hatch. I like mine 70-75% because I remove my chicks as they hatch.
    3)No, you don't unless your temp starts elevating past 101-102. If you start getting condensation you may want to lift a lid/window and let a little humidity out of there.
    4)A chick can stay in the incubator for up to three days. Many people do not remove chicks until the hatch is complete. I remove mine once they are hatched and active (and I have more than one).
    5)If your humidity is good opening the incubator as long as you are quick should not pose a problem. If you find that your humidity drops significantly when you open have a wet sponge paper towel handy to slip in there. Opening the bator poses a small chance of affecting the other eggs.(I do not have problems and I open mine at hatch.)
    6) Day 24 is a good amount of time. You can always candle at the end of day 22 to see if there are any signs of life and if it's worth waiting another couple days. Water candling is also an option if you have no pips.

    Good luck!!!
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Phunter14

    Phunter14 Out Of The Brooder

    16
    5
    26
    Apr 2, 2015

    Thank you so much. Feeling a bit more confident.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2015
    1 person likes this.

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