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200 feet of extension cords, is it to much??

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by ginbart, Dec 7, 2009.

  1. ginbart

    ginbart Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 9, 2008
    Bloomsburg, PA
    I think I understand that and I'm sure the man at TSC will help me out. Thanks everyone now all I need is the water heater and a new waterier [​IMG]
     
  2. Akane

    Akane Overrun With Chickens

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    I've run 300' with cords from local stores so probably 14-16gauge 100' each. It's really hard to find 12 gauge in length at local stores. I've only found it online and it costs a bit. You might as well get insulated lines run that will let you plug in anything you want. The cords I got allowed for a heat lamp and heated bucket or 2. It flipped the surge protector I had at that end if I plugged in a small space heater and everything dimmed if I plugged in another 250w heat lamp.

    If you put a cord with less capacity for electricity first you will cut how much gets to the next cord so it's dumb not to put the lowest gauge first if you are using multiple gauge wires. The 12 gauge will get more electricity to the 14gauge than the 14 gauge would to the 12.


    For safety I wrap all connections in electrical tape while dry. Looooots of electrical tape. Then at the end I use a surge protector with all open slots covered to prevent dust accumulation. Also make sure you are using cords graded for outdoors in your climate. The really heavy duty stuff should have a temperature range or climate ranking.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2009
  3. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    I think that if I were doing what you hope to do, I'd got to Home Depot and talk to their master electrician. I would have him to pick out 250 (+ or -) feet of wire that is meant to be buried later. I would also ask him to select female/male plugs to put on the ends, thus making a long, temporary extension cord that later can be buried and attached to your home's circuit box when/if you decide to make a permanent connection.
     
  4. twentynine

    twentynine Chillin' With My Peeps

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    watts divided by volts equal amps

    14 ga extension cords are good for a max of 15 amps up to 100' after that voltage drop would come into play. No problem running a light bulb or maybe a small heated waterer. Her in La we do not need the heated waterers so I am not familiar with electrical requirements, but I assume it can't be much over 100-200 watts. I'll cruise on over to TSC catalog store and see what I can find out.

    200' of run with out a doubt you need 12 ga cords. However 12 ga cords equaling that length will cost you a pile of money. For sure over $100.

    This is what I would do.

    Exactly what Joe says-----
    With one difference, I'd go myself to a Mom and Pop hardware store. You can forget getting any expert help at the HD, Lowes or TSC any more, you will be lucky to find a dead head high school kid putting 110 volt recpticles into the wrong display boxes. Years ago HD made practice of hiring "experts" that is no longer true.

    Buy 1- 250' roll of 12/2 wg romex, use it for your extension cord. Along with the romex buy 200+ (or the length required) of 3/4" PVC conduit. Put the romex in the conduit. Install heavy duty plugs on each end. Use as extension cord.

    Then in spring when the ground thaws, you have 99% of the material required to install a proper electrical service to the chicken house. And you will only have purchased what you need.

    Cost of the romex should be somewhere around $100, conduit is about $10 per 100', plugs, proper water tight fittings for conduit and glue $25-$30. If you buy 200' of 12 ga extension cord it will run your coop, but next winter you are going to be right where you are now, if you buy the romex/ conduit and install the line properly it will be a slightly higher cost now, but you will be set forever.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2009
  5. jafo

    jafo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If it was me, I'd buy a roll (250') of exterior 12 ga wire at Home Depot or Lowes or someplace like that, and run it to the coop with a 4 plug box on it. Plug or wire the other end into a GFI (ground fault interupter) switch, or wire it to a 15 amp breaker in the fuse box. Springtime, I'd bury it. I did a heavy extension cord, like I described, only had to go 45 feet though. 100 or better, I'd do the exterior 12 ga, it's made to be buried.
     
  6. chickendude

    chickendude Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 4, 2009
    Dutchess County NY
    "If it was me, I'd buy a roll (250') of exterior 12 ga wire at Home Depot or Lowes or someplace like that, and run it to the coop with a 4 plug box on it. Plug or wire the other end into a GFI (ground fault interupter) switch, or wire it to a 15 amp breaker in the fuse box."
    Jafo I did the same and it is working fine for me.
     
  7. ginbart

    ginbart Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 9, 2008
    Bloomsburg, PA
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] Ok guys, I'm a lady and I don't have any help with this. We rent so I don't can't put anything under ground so that's not an option I can do. Watts divided by volts equal amps, I have NO idea what that means. [​IMG]

    twentynine, after you cruise on over to TSC catalog store could you let me know what you find out.

    I did see this and I thought I would try it, what do you think? I don't think it would use that many, watts, volts or amps. It's post one.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=107951

    I really appreciate all the help your giving me. I was think of using PCP pipe where the cords connected to keep them out the weather and no one would drive over the cords. I would cover them with duck tape so the snow and water couldn't get in the pipe.
     
  8. ginbart

    ginbart Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 9, 2008
    Bloomsburg, PA
    Quote:Joe, is this something that can be put above ground for the winter? If I decide to do this I could just put it away in the summer and if we should move I could take it with me. Thanks
     
  9. mdbokc

    mdbokc Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 22, 2009
    Oklahoma County, OK
    ginbart, yes, you can have that weather cord lay on top of the ground through the winter and put it away in the warm months just fine. I did that for a couple of years as it was located in a non-walkway area. I just placed scrap wood over a couple areas where I was concerned there might be some contact or possible damage.

    On an earlier comment I made, The smaller gauge elec cords have the higher capacity drop than larger cable. So use the cord with the least drop nearest the source of power. In other words, #12 with less power drop is located nearer the power source. The #14 is smaller diameter wire and has a higher power drop in length so it is used second.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2009
  10. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:Joe, is this something that can be put above ground for the winter? If I decide to do this I could just put it away in the summer and if we should move I could take it with me. Thanks

    Yes, you can make a long extension cord using #12 wire meant to be buried and leave it above ground during the winter. Then you can put it away for the spring, summer, and fall when you don't need it. When you move, you can take it all with you.
    Twentynine's suggestion, "Buy 1- 250' roll of 12/2 wg romex, use it for your extension cord...Install heavy duty plugs on each end. Use as extension cord," is a good one.

    EDIT: I sure hope that I have not suggested that I know diddly dip about electricity because I don't. It just seemed/seems reasonable to think that a very good, long extension cord could be made relatively cheaply and would work during the winter.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2009

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