3 chickens 28 weeks old - 2 have never layed an egg

michelleo

In the Brooder
5 Years
Mar 24, 2014
13
0
24
Richardson, TX
I have 3 chickens, the buff orphington started laying at 21 weeks old and consistently lays everyday at the same time, even 2 double yolks so far. The Golden lace Wyandotte and speckled sussex haven't layed a one yet. They are on Purina Layena with omega 3, with oyster shell mixed in and scratch mixed in too.

Does it take some breeds longer than others? Is it possible they won't ever lay? and they are definitely not roosters.

Thanks!!
 

Judy

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Feb 5, 2009
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South Georgia
They will most likely get around to it when they are ready. It can take a very variable amount of time. Actually, you're fortunate in a way because BO's tend to be a bit slow maturing, and take longer than that.

Scratch is OK in small quantities as a treat or to teach them to come when called, but it isn't a complete food. They would be better off with just the layer feed as their regular feed.

See the second to last column: https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/chickens-loosing-feathers-managing-your-flocks-molt
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
93,973
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SW Michigan
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I have 3 chickens, the buff orphington started laying at 21 weeks old and consistently lays everyday at the same time, even 2 double yolks so far. The Golden lace Wyandotte and speckled sussex haven't layed a one yet. They are on Purina Layena with omega 3, with oyster shell mixed in and scratch mixed in too.

Does it take some breeds longer than others? Is it possible they won't ever lay? and they are definitely not roosters.

Thanks!!
I'd not mix the scratch and shell in with their feed.
You are diluting the protein, vitamins, minerals, etc in the feed.
That feed is 16% protein, not sure what your scratch contains.
I feed a 20% protein feed then give them some 8% protein scratch grains as a treat at the end of the day.
Offer the shell in a separate container always available so they can take only what they need when they need it.

They will most likely get around to it when they are ready. It can take a very variable amount of time. Actually, you're fortunate in a way because BO's tend to be a bit slow maturing, and take longer than that.

Scratch is OK in small quantities as a treat or to teach them to come when called, but it isn't a complete food. They would be better off with just the layer feed as their regular feed.

See the second to last column: https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/chickens-loosing-feathers-managing-your-flocks-molt
@Judy Confused about 'column'???
 
Last edited:

michelleo

In the Brooder
5 Years
Mar 24, 2014
13
0
24
Richardson, TX
I'd not mix the scratch and shell in with their feed.
You are diluting the protein, vitamins, minerals, etc in the feed.
That feed is 16% protein, not sure what your scratch contains.
I feed a 20% protein feed then give them some 8% protein scratch grains as a treat at the end of the day.
Offer the shell in a separate container always available so they can take only what they need when they need it.

@Judy Confused about 'column'???
They only eat the oyster shell they need, i find it all over the ground, so they are picking it out. I won't mix it in anymore and will provide separately, but it doesn't explain why one is consisitently laying and has been since 21 weeks and 2 haven't started yet and are 28.5 weeks.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
93,973
122,874
1,807
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
They only eat the oyster shell they need, i find it all over the ground, so they are picking it out. I won't mix it in anymore and will provide separately, but it doesn't explain why one is consisitently laying and has been since 21 weeks and 2 haven't started yet and are 28.5 weeks.
All chickens are individuals, some breeds/lines of breeds are different too.
They can all mature and start ovulating at different rate/times and may also convert nutrition with varying efficiency.

Not sure what you were feeding them before the layer feed, or if you even raised them from chicks...but if you were diluting the protein there too it may have slowed their growth/maturity.

Are the non-laying pullets combs plump and shiny?
Do they 'squat' when you go to pet them?
Have they been checking out the nests?
These are all signs of impending laying.

Do you free range, could they be laying out in their range area?
What kind of housing, lots of room to reduce any possible stress?

There could be reasons.....or it could just be an uncontrollable fate....it's hard to wait for those first eggs!!
 

michelleo

In the Brooder
5 Years
Mar 24, 2014
13
0
24
Richardson, TX
All chickens are individuals, some breeds/lines of breeds are different too.
They can all mature and start ovulating at different rate/times and may also convert nutrition with varying efficiency.

Not sure what you were feeding them before the layer feed, or if you even raised them from chicks...but if you were diluting the protein there too it may have slowed their growth/maturity.

Are the non-laying pullets combs plump and shiny?
Do they 'squat' when you go to pet them?
Have they been checking out the nests?
These are all signs of impending laying.

Do you free range, could they be laying out in their range area?
What kind of housing, lots of room to reduce any possible stress?

There could be reasons.....or it could just be an uncontrollable fate....it's hard to wait for those first eggs!!
Aart,

Raised from 4 day old chicks, on 100% starter/grower crumbles. c
Combs are red and plumpon wyandotte, not so much on the sussex, but more red than 2 weeks ago.
Only the Buff that is currently laying squats.
yes checking out nests, they cheer on the buff everytime she lays.
they are housed in a tractor and get a new spot of grass every 2 days.

I'm obviously not a patient enough person.
 

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