3 year old Barred Rock sick, help!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by tezolt, Oct 6, 2014.

  1. tezolt

    tezolt Out Of The Brooder

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    I was given 4 barred rocks from someone that didn't want them any more during the spring. Ever since then I have noticed one very fragile/thin shelled egg or a broken egg in the nest boxes fairly regularly. About a week ago, I noticed one of the barred rocks started to isolate herself from the rest of the other 15. I couldn't understand why she was doing this as she had no other symptoms besides some occasional diarrhea. I thought she may have been worked up about two new roosters that were introduced two weeks prior, however about 5 days after her beginning to isolate herself, she didn't go into her coop at night and luckily I found her as it dropped from 60 to freezing within a few hours. When I brought her in she basically fell over as she couldn't stand well and seemed unbalanced. I had some extra 30% protein game bird crumble that was medicated and she started pecking at it after I had a brooder lamp on her. I gave her electrolytes and Corid in her water just in case. Her diarrhea has changed from foamy yellow to green and to white, and is very projectile over a course of a week. I always thought she was on the pudgy side, so I tied that and the mystery broken/fragile eggs to her and possible egg yolk peritonitis. However she is losing a lot of feathers, even including a couple primary wing feathers. I have been feeding her little slivers of apple, tomatoe, and grapes and she eagerly eats it, although it still isn't exaxtly normal amounts. She is drinking about a quart of water a day which seems excessive unless a lot is evaporating from the brooder lamp. She has made some progress and eagerly stands with much better balance when I go to check on her. I am debating on starting her on an off brand duramycin, it's the only thing I can find in stock locally, two stores were sold out, probably not a good sign... Any help or ideas would be greatly appreciated!

    It also seems that her belly and between her legs are a little spongey. Its hard to examine her as her feathers are very loose and falling out though so this may be misinformation. No other flock members are showing any differences in normal behavior even though temperatures have drastically fluctuated here. Could this simply be an extremely harsh/high stress moult or is there definitely something bateria related? I don't think it is worms, mites, or a virus as the others are still little bug chasing machines.

    Any ideas or past experiences will help!
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Last edited: Oct 6, 2014
  3. tezolt

    tezolt Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you dawg! I assume I should go ahead and deworm the whole flock, do you recommend this also?
     
  4. tezolt

    tezolt Out Of The Brooder

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    How long for egg withdrawal following valbazen? Can I dose this per gallon for rest of flock?
     
  5. tezolt

    tezolt Out Of The Brooder

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    "Capillaria obsignata has a direct development. Freshly deposited eggs require 6 to 8 days to develop completely formed embryos. The eggs remain infective
    for a period of up to 14 days. Following the ingestion of the worm eggs from the pasture, the embryo escapes from the egg and completes its development
    in the duodenum of the host bird. Birds infected with Capillaria obsignata spend much of their time apart from the rest of the flock, huddled on the ground
    or corner of the house. They develop diarrhoea and the feathers are ruffled. These first clinical symptoms are noted at approximately 12 days after infection."

    Roosters were introduced about 12 days before the hen started isolating herself. Also the roosters were showing a lot of intestinal wall shedding, which I am now suspecting is due to capillary worms with the help of a respected BYC member. I am highly certain this is what she has, but there is probably other parasitic worms involved too. I have not had a fecal analysis performed so I understand that I can't say for sure, but I can't deny that this description matches my sick chicken's symptom best through multiple days of research.

    Since valbazen stays in her system for 3 days, and I treat her 10 days after the first treatment, this will reach that 14 day mark where the eggs are remaining infective. Will this terminate the infection possibility of this specific parasite? Would it be okay to treat in another 10 days following the second treatment to reduce the chance of a worm reproducing later on if it entered her system following the initial three days that Valbazen is active? Did I misinterpret the above quote and the eggs actually are viable for 20-22 days instead of just 14? Any help would be greatly appreciated. I am trying to determine my best possible treatment method to eradicate this specific parasite by tracking it's reproduction phase. I know it will involve some luck in the end, but does anyone see something else or feel they can offer some ideas? I understand the possibility of the parasite gaining enhanced immunity with repetitive treatments and the possible negative effects on my chickens' health, but I am just trying to think everything through before I introduce a drug to a part of my family.

    How many treatments can you perform in succession on chickens with valbazen? I agree that two treatments initially and reoccurring treatments every few months would be a well planned preventive and treatment method, but since this specific organism is only transferred directly rather than indirectly through earthworms or such, I feel it may be possible to eradicate it completely out of my soil with some luck and a well planned treatment protocol. And since I have never had round, tape, or gapeworm problems before, I may be able to get away deworming twice a year, rather than 4 to 6 times a year, or still using natural methods.

    This is just fuel on the fire in treating my sick chicken and I hope some BYC members can offer some thoughts so that I can get my revenge on these pesky parasites! Thanks to anyone that responds!
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    It would be okay to dose your birds a third or even a fourth time if you wish, as valbazen is a very safe wormer. Keep in mind that it is the only wormer that slowly kills worms over several days. It would take an infestation of capillary worms to cause shed intestinal lining/blood. Millions of eggs have been deposited onto/into the soil to be picked up by other birds, this is true with other types of worms as well. There is no way to treat the contaminated soil. You're correct, it's possible for birds to be infected with different types of worms at the same time, I've had it happen.
    When birds are finished with molt, you can use safeguard liquid goat wormer in rotation with valbazen to worm your birds to prevent resistance. There are other wormers that can be used as well. If other worms are involved, both these wormers will take care of them. It's best to worm your birds individually using a syringe without a needle. Adding wormers to water is guesswork; you dont know if a bird drank it, or drank enough of it to be effective. Also, sick birds wont drink. Birds drink less water in cooler/colder temperatures. Additionally some wormers dont mix well in water and settle to the bottom. Giving it to each bird orally guarantees they got properly wormed with the correct amount.
     

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