36.5 degrees C (97.7F) too low?

Heluerto

Chirping
9 Years
Jul 9, 2010
100
0
89
Banbury, UK
I cannot seem to lift the temperature of my incubater any higher than this - not sure what the problem is, as previously it has been at the correct temperature. Will this be a problem? I understand it may cause a delay in hatching, but wondered if anyone else incubated at a lower temperature?
 

Heluerto

Chirping
9 Years
Jul 9, 2010
100
0
89
Banbury, UK
I have a Corti 25 Fully Automatic. I cant find the instructions. It has a screw on the top, which I have tried turning to see if it makes a difference, but it doesnt seem to do anything.
 

ranchhand

Rest in Peace 1956-2011
11 Years
Aug 25, 2008
13,295
54
291
SC
Is your thermometer 100% accurate?

And IF the screw you are turning is the heat setting be aware that it could take many hours for it to adjust.

Look online for the manual, many manufacturer's have the manuals posted on their website.
 

DrRob

In the Brooder
8 Years
Feb 10, 2011
99
1
39
Middle Chinnock, Crewkerne,UK
I know a breeder who breeds Chocolate Orpingtons and Chocolate Pekin/Cochin Bantams and she always has her incubator running at 36.7 and the humidity at 45 % throughout her complete incubation - she doesn't even increase after lockdown, and her hatches are over 95 percent and that has been into the thousands therefore I would not worry too much.

Regards
Dr Rob.
 

tay_boe

Songster
9 Years
Aug 27, 2010
495
1
109
So this maybe a dumb question but does that mean it's better for the temp to be lower than higher?
 
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DrRob

In the Brooder
8 Years
Feb 10, 2011
99
1
39
Middle Chinnock, Crewkerne,UK
The breeder told me higher temperatures cause the chick to develop quicker than it should this can cause abnormalities, with regards to the humidity the increased humidity in the egg during the final stages of incubation 18+ days can cause increased liquid within the egg and this can lead to drowning.
I asked about the chick being shrink wrapped in his membrane if this dries during those final few days and she said she had never experienced that at all.
I cannot say if this works or not but being she has bred over a thousand expensive chicks she cannot afford to any mistakes there fore I am following her instructions and will keep everyone up to day on how my incubation goes.

Regards
Dr Rob
 

Heluerto

Chirping
9 Years
Jul 9, 2010
100
0
89
Banbury, UK
Well, the supplier of the incubator has confirmed the screw is the temperature control, and confirmed it needs turning clockwise to increase, but over the past couple of days I have turned it round and round, and now it's up to 36.7. The supplier has offered to sort the problem under it's warranty, but of course then it's what to do with the fertile eggs which have now been in six days already.

Thanks DrRob, that's really put my mind at rest for now at least. I will continue with this incubation, but then send it back under warranty before next attempt. Whilst the lower temperature may be fine, I should be able to change it as required. May as well whilst it's still under warranty.
 

Gypsy07

Songster
9 Years
Feb 4, 2010
2,286
54
193
Glasgow, Scotland
Quote:I don't want to pooh-pooh your breeder friend's advice, but I think that some of their information is factually incorrect. Many many years of artificial incubation has shown 99.5F (37.5C) to be the most suitable temperature for forced air incubation of chicken eggs. Higher than ideal temperature causes faster development and possible abnormalities, but lower than ideal temperatures cause slower development and possible abnormalities as well.

If the chick drowns in the shell it is not caused by too-high humidity in the final three days of incubation. It is caused by too-high humidity in the first 18 days of incubation. The way I understand it, and I'm almost certain I'm correct on this, if humidity has been correct in the first 18 days and the egg has lost enough moisture going into lockdown, the chick will not - CAN not! - drown no matter how high the humidity over the next three days. (I run my lockdowns at 80-90% humidity and I've NEVER had a chick drown.) The chick also can not drown in the first 18 days of incubation. It cannot drown before it pips internally and starts breathing air from the air sac. At that point, if the egg has not lost sufficient moisture, the chick will inhale the excess fluid and drown.

I'm not disputing your breeder friend's results though, and if s/he is getting regular 95% hatch rates then s/he is obviously doing something right.
 
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