5th toe genetics,need some help from the genetics experts.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Georgia Boy 1970, Feb 26, 2013.

  1. Georgia Boy 1970

    Georgia Boy 1970 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I will start here.I have rooster that is a pure polish.He is a tolblunt/golden laced split.I bred him over several easter egger hens.The pullets and roosters along with the sire/daddy rooster was on the yard,just them.When the pullets started laying,I decided to hatch some of their eggs.And to my surprise several of the chicks were born with the 5th toe on one foot and not the other,and some both feet had the 5th toe.None of the parents have the 5th toe.So I was puzzled,just came to the conclusion that brother/sister mating brought it out or that since some in the U.S. have used mottled houdans in their tolblunt polish projects,thought this might be it.What is going on?
     
  2. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Polydactyly ( extra toes) is caused by an incompletely dominant autosomal gene.There are also genes that can modify the expression of polydactyly and also a gene that can inhibit the expression.

    At least one of the parents is carrying the gene for polydactyly which was passed on to the offspring; the parent also carries a gene that inhibits the expression. The offspring did not inherit the gene that inhibits the expression; therefore they have 5 toes.

    There is also a recessive gene that can cause polydactyly but it is expressed in a different manner; I do not believe it is this type of polydactyly.

    Tim
     
  3. Georgia Boy 1970

    Georgia Boy 1970 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Thanks Tim
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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  5. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Syndactyly can also be found in chickens. No specific gene mentioned in the research

    Tim
     

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