8x8 coop or 10x12 coop?

0die

Songster
5 Years
Apr 20, 2015
242
120
146
corpus christi, tx 78413
Well, you'd have enough coop space for 30-40 chickens if I'm correct, and you might want a 10x35 run. The 10x30 run could hold up to 37ish chickens, once again, if I'm correct.
that sounds very tight to me. almost like a factory farm. I have 10 birds with a 15x75 run and it's probably about maxed out. They are rather bored from the lack of roaming space. They runs to the gate every time I let them into the front yard.
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
Premium Feather Member
Jul 3, 2016
13,909
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WA, Pac NW
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that sounds very tight to me. almost like a factory farm. I have 10 birds with a 15x75 run and it's probably about maxed out. They are rather bored from the lack of roaming space. They runs to the gate every time I let them into the front yard.

They're trying to guilt you into thinking it's not enough!

Mine gather in the run corner closest to the house around 3:30 daily, they know it's time to come out.
 
Aug 30, 2020
45
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As the time is coming closer for the shed to be delivered I have gathered some materials so far for the run. I bought the 2x4s from a sawmill which saved me almost $70 and they are true 2x4s very solid and straight. I ordered the hardware cloth online since it was less than Home Depot or Lowe’s.

I have been reading online on how to attach the hardware cloth to the run. I have seen people use screws with big washers, but I feel like that’ll get expensive fast-but probably the best way to secure it. Luckily(knock on wood) I haven’t had any issues with anything trying to get inside the coop yet.

and I have seen people using staples like these
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Gardner...ray-Silver-Dipped-100-Pack-MDI-150Y/100210258

would those work well? Or should I do the screw and washer method?
 

BarredRockMom

Crowing
7 Years
Jun 9, 2013
700
1,873
307
Pennsylvania
I got chickens this year right at the end of spring.
It was a trial and I bought used pre fab 4x8 coop-sleeping area is 4x4

attached is a 10x10 run covered with tarps and it just looks tacky and I want to do it up nice. Turns out we love chickens and the eggs they produce. So we’re looking for a more permanent option.

I am looking to purchase a shed(new) and convert it into a coop. I walked into an 8x8 and thought wow this is big but I feel like it’ll fill up fast.

ideally I’d like a 10x12 I have all the room I need to put it where ever I want. Either set up I’m thinking about a 10x20 or a 10x30 run. Obviously for simplicity the 10x12 shed would work best.

I am looking to Go from my 13 chickens now to roughly 30-40 chickens. What do you guys think I should do?
In my opinion, always go bigger with that coop!! You plan & plan, all the while forgetting that a) the Creator is chuckling, b) that the 'Chicken Math thing' you've heard about IS REAL & c) that you'll actually be saving yourself some future work//aggro.

Your flocks (present & future) will appreciate it.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Nov 27, 2012
92,049
117,411
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SW Michigan
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I have been reading online on how to attach the hardware cloth to the run. I have seen people use screws with big washers, but I feel like that’ll get expensive fast-but probably the best way to secure it. Luckily(knock on wood) I haven’t had any issues with anything trying to get inside the coop yet.

and I have seen people using staples like these
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Gardner...ray-Silver-Dipped-100-Pack-MDI-150Y/100210258

would those work well? Or should I do the screw and washer method?
Lots of different ways to do it.
Not sure 1/2" staples will hold up, those are made for holding cable in place.

I used screws and washers, because IMO:
- easier than hammering, especially on some of my framing.
- will hold better long term.
- can be easily removed in case of oopsies.
I prefer screws for almost all fastening for the same reasons.
 

Vacman

Chirping
Dec 25, 2020
51
120
68
Cadillac, MI
BTW, what are your 4 X made of? They should be treated lumber or cedar so they won't rot in the ground and cause you future problems. You could also use steel T-posts. Those are probably the wrong staples. You don't need plastic coated. Just plain steel staples are good, but I agree with the above, my preference would be screws and washer because: A. I have cordless drivers and B. I can remove them easily if I have to.and C. My arthritis likes me using a screw gun better than a hammer! If you had chosen steel T-posts, I wood have recommended stainless steel zip ties. I never knew they were available until my neighbor got them. They're not expensive and have much better strength than nylon zip ties.
 

rayrose

Songster
Apr 17, 2020
202
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101
Columbia, SC
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You really need screws and washers. They work so much better
and aren't that expensive. You also should use pressure treated
wood. The posts don't have to be cemented into the ground. They'll work fine on top.
 

U_Stormcrow

Crowing
Jun 7, 2020
1,571
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North FL Panhandle Region / Wiregrass
and I have seen people using staples like these
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Gardner...ray-Silver-Dipped-100-Pack-MDI-150Y/100210258

would those work well? Or should I do the screw and washer method?


Those will pull right out if tested. Use screws and flat washers, buy in bulk. Poultry staples, which at least have some texture, can work too, IF you get them big enough, and IF they don't split your wood when you nail them in.

Look for bulk purchases of zinc plated or galvanized washers - preferably fender washers (more surface area relative to hole diameter) - usually cheaper than stainless, and a box of good weatherproof screws. A 100-pack of 1" x 1/8" fender washers is around $10, and you are looking at $6-$10 for a similar number of screws, depending on what you are screwing into, and how deeply they need to embed.
 

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