A cross breed with a super small rooster and a big hen

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Wanex, Sep 30, 2014.

  1. Wanex

    Wanex Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would like to know if anyone has ever seen, had/have, or even think about crossing an Oegb and a Buff Orpington. The reason why I ask this is because I have a Ginger Red Oegb rooster and two buff orpington pullets that I purchased from a feed store on April, and i would like to see or even hear of an idea on how they would look. Due to the size of my Oegb rooster its impossible for him to mate with the hens :-D, but I could artificially inseminate them.
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    My miniature males never had a problem breeding massive hens, AI shouldn't be necessary. Yes, tiny males and massive hens (and vice versa) are regularly crossed all over the world, naturally, shouldn't be a problem. The chooks you get will probably be a rather boring mix, unfortunately, some probably large, others small, many inbetween.

    Best wishes.
     
  3. Wanex

    Wanex Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you, but other problem is that the hens don't let the rooster mate them, its funny though. [​IMG]
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I don't know why you'd go through the bother of AI for mixed breed birds, especially without a specific purpose. I think you'll get mid sized reddish buff birds. They might make nice broodies, but that would be about their only redeeming characteristic.
     
  5. Wanex

    Wanex Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just want to see what they would lool like and their personalities :) but ig im not doing it anymore.
     
  6. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Well, if they won't let a small rooster mate, they won't let a large one either. If a hen really doesn't want to mate, she simply won't move her tail feathers, and there's nothing the rooster can do about it. Is it perhaps more a case of him grabbing on too far back so they only think they're being attacked? It's also possible that they're just far too young for it.

    Despite the complaining, chasing and catching, and the dim view people take of it, most normal matings aren't actually forcible, it's just that the males are rude, clumsy, rough, and the hens resigned to it. They're courtesy matings. I have only ever seen a few hens outright refuse to mate, and trust me, physically there is nothing the rooster can do about it if she won't move into position.

    I'd pay more heed to why your females don't want to mate with him; there is a chance it's just due to social breakdown or breed or individual tendencies, but also a chance it's due to something being very wrong with him. A rooster who treats hens well is almost never short of a willing mate unless something's very off...

    As for AI, it causes quite a few problems when used as a preferred or common alternative to normal matings rather than under emergency or utterly necessary circumstances, I don't believe it should be done for the fun of it or just as a method of 'normal' breeding without a serious need, i.e. very rare genetics needing to be preserved. Confusing their sexual instincts is one source of much social disease among them.

    Best wishes.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2014
  7. Wanex

    Wanex Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for all the information, I'll keep that in mind. Maybe they are a little too young, one barely started laying yesterday. And i didn't know absolutely nothing about A.I just on how to do it. Anyway the rooster has a great personality and treats the hens good and takes really good care of the.
     
  8. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    All good then, hope it goes well for your flock.

    If you don't know anything about AI, please, don't be like some people and just start fiddling with their butts without a clue! [​IMG]

    One person in particular was only succeeding in getting their rooster to poop on them. :/ Then they decided to ask how to do it. You'd think people would do the research before just going and meddling with their animals' sexual organs... But apparently not all people read up on how to do AI before attempting it...

    (I didn't get the impression that you were doing this, for the record, but I mention it because it's worth bearing in mind, since it's not too uncommon for people to do this sort of stuff).

    Sounds like they are too young right now, but they should have their instincts stirred by having a male around and eventually come around to liking him; hens who reach complete adulthood, at two years or so, without ever living with a rooster, can often be hopeless causes when it comes to males, since their instincts have never been stimulated and that's something best done while they're young. Otherwise, they have no interest in roosters, and absolutely no tolerance for them. It makes a stressful and unhappy life for all animals involved.

    Best wishes.
     
  9. Wanex

    Wanex Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I meant that i didn't know all the information for A.I but I've seen videos on YouTube and have read something about that topic. I would never hurt my animals its just that i couldn't find any other way around. But again i appreciate a lot your helpful information.
     
  10. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    I didn't think you were utterly unread or going to hurt them, it was just a funny memory, that's all. People fiddling with their animals without a clue how to do AI is kinda funny in a kinda sick way. Sorry.

    Best wishes.
     

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