A farmer's quote on feed prices

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by hencackle, Mar 6, 2008.

  1. hencackle

    hencackle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 25, 2007
    Telford, TN
    One of the farmers that sells meat at a local farmers market had this to say regarding escalating feed prices:
    By the way, thank your Congressman, Senator and the President for the increase in pork prices this year. Since 2006, feed prices have doubled because of the demand for corn in the production of ethanol. The production of ethanol is subsidized. As a consumer, you get to pay for the ethanol subsidy twice: in increased food prices and by direct subsidy to ethanol producers. Interestingly, the price of ethanol is collapsing because there is no way to deliver it to the consumer.​
     
  2. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    After reading Michael Pollan's book I have far less sympahty for our nation's corn addiction. I've started growing my own grain on a small scale to feed my animals. I think now is the time to vertically integrate your farms and you will come out ahead.
     
  3. hencackle

    hencackle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 25, 2007
    Telford, TN
    I agree with you greyfields. If only I had more land--even one extra acre, I would do the same as you.
    I haven't read Mr. Pollan's book (yet)...are you an AcresUSA or Weston A. Price subscriber?

    On a different, but related topic, high fructose corn syrup has no place in our food supply. The obesity and type 2 diabetes has risen tremendously since the 70s when HFCS began to replace table sugar as the sweetener.
     
  4. DrakeMaiden

    DrakeMaiden Overrun with Drakes

    Jun 8, 2007
    Kitsap County, WA
    I saw this one coming a few years ago . . . well, I read it on the internet somewhere or other.

    There is more going on too, there are droughts in the grain belts, causing all grain prices to sky rocket.

    I also agree with greyfields, in that corn is not a good choice in feed. Our diet is out of balance and we need to learn to diversify our food system. Otherwise there is trouble ahead.
     
  5. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    I know PCC markets in Seattle stopped carrying any products containing high fructose corn syrup. Some very health conscious people were very surprised to find some of their favorite products unavailable. It's in like everything.
     
  6. hencackle

    hencackle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 25, 2007
    Telford, TN
    What are you growing for feed, greyfields?
     
  7. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 15, 2007
    Washington State
    Winter Rye (4 ac) and Oats (3 ac) at the moment. I need to find a combine before too much longer, though. I've seen a few 30 year old ones advertised for around my budget of $1k or less. It's just a matter of getting them here.

    With even bad yields I should get 80 bushels of Rye and 50 bushels of oats. That should be over 3 tons of grain, which is enough for me to get 7 pigs to market weight... minus the cut the guy with the roller mill takes. It's not enough to feed my farm for a whole seaon, but every single dollar counts when trying to be profitable in agriculture.

    Once I pull out the Rye, I should be able to get two crops of Buckwheat which will also help clean up the ground. In place of the oats (I'm growing field peas in there with them) I plan to put in fodder beets for the pigs/cows. But, I can't find an organic source for fodder beets in the US... so I'm actually using organic turnips. They're not even fodder turnips, but can get up to 2 lbs each. It's the best I can do at this time.

    [edit]

    I have a tremendous ammount of sympahty for the plight of industrial raised broilers in the US. The fact we can get chicken for $0.99 per pound is all based upon the huge grain subsidies. There is this fear that the public will rebel when meat prices double. I think they OUGHT double. We need to be eating higher quality meat, less often, and as a society we will be far healthier and moral. I think my price of $3.50 per pound dressed weight on a chicken is fair... but I fear we have generations of consumers who view chicken as cheap and disposable meat. Good chicken raised correctly is unlike anything they've ever tasted.

    My personal inspiration for the lifestyle change, though, is good old Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall:

    http://www.rivercottage.net/

    If you don't have his cookbooks, I cannot recommend them more... and yes he's English (so is my mother and wife, I have tremendous respect for the Smallholder lifestyle available in the UK):

    http://tinyurl.com/25ke59

    http://tinyurl.com/2zt3bo

    http://tinyurl.com/2cmscb
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2008

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