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Adding water to Incubator

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by jhrutkay, Feb 13, 2009.

  1. jhrutkay

    jhrutkay Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 9, 2009
    I just got the HovaBator 1588 yesterday..........Plugged it in and it is cool. Got my egg turner in there and everything.

    Holds at 100 degrees without me doing anything.......which is great.

    My question is about the humidity. I got a hygrometer.......got it working and it is holding at 65% which from what I read is a good number.

    I am getting ready to put my eggs in.

    Is there a rule of thumb about how much water I need to add to maintain the humidity. I think it said to add water everyday and I know it should be warm water (correct?).........is it about 1/2 cup........1/4 cup or anything like that or am I just supposed to test it out and work it own on my own because of all the variables here in my house.

    Any help is appreciated. Thank you.
     
  2. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

    6,923
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    Feb 11, 2008
    Waterloo, Nebraska
    Just add water when the humidity drops, or put a wet sponge in.
     
  3. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Quote:65 is too high.

    Check that there is only water in the appropriate trays (it's in the manual) You want the humidity to be nearer to 50.

    The water surface area is the important factor. You increase it to raise RH, and decrease it to lower. Add warm water if you can.

    Good luck
     
  4. jhrutkay

    jhrutkay Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 9, 2009
    50% is best to start out???

    what should I raise it to when they start hatching?

    It is hard to see the bottom of the Hovabator when you pour water in.........hard to tell where it goes
     
  5. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Quote:Generally 45 to 50, yes. Raise it to around 70 from day 18
     
  6. duck&chickencrazy

    duck&chickencrazy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 2, 2008
    Indiana
    i thought it was 30-40f to start out
     
  7. Sissy

    Sissy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 18, 2007
    Sevier county, Tn.
    Mine came in --- My hova-1588 and is holding 51-57 hum and Its steady
    since last week temp holding 100 and Im leaving it as is..
    this is my first try and will see what happens..
    I use a straw with a small sz. funnel to add 4oz when the hum. drops.
    I add hot water.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2009
  8. coffeemama

    coffeemama Barista Queen

    Mar 5, 2008
    Oregono
    45-50% is generally recommended I think. Then 65-70% after day 18. I just add water to the middle well (fill it) every 2 days but we have a fairly humid climate. Then I fill the next well and add a few sponge strips if needed after day 18.
     
  9. horsejody

    horsejody Squeaky Wheel

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    Feb 11, 2008
    Waterloo, Nebraska
    Different levels work for different people. The MS State website says:

    Humidity is carefully controlled to prevent unnecessary loss of egg moisture. The relative humidity in the incubator between setting and three days prior to hatching should remain at 58-60% or 84-86 degree F., wet-bulb. When hatching, the humidity is increased to 65% relative humidity or more.

    The UN website says:

    The relative humidity inside the incubator should be between 50 percent and 55 percent during the first 18 days and between 60 percent and 65 percent during the remainder of the incubation period.


    Some people are successful using what is called the "dry incubation method." I'm not sure what they say the humidity levels should be.
     
  10. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    Quote:The first sets of numbers are near enough for most purposes.

    NO ONE is successful with Dry Incubation. It's a crank theory which, in practise, is never achieved.

    The question isn't whether or not moisture in the air is necessary (it is) but rather how much.

    Those who profess dry incubation are doing nothing of the sort, and any of them who achieve results above about 50% hatch rate are living in a very damp climate.

    They probably think that mold on the walls is a sign of good health too.
     

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