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ADOLESCENT SILKIE ROOSTER ABUSES HEN IS THERE A FIX????

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Georgia Nana, Sep 17, 2013.

  1. Georgia Nana

    Georgia Nana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 13, 2011
    Kathleen, Georgia
    I have a 6month old Sweet Silkie rooster who loves his little flock of five 4mo old babies (sex is still undetermined). There are Never any issues! He even "Puts" them to bed in their coop before he goes to his coop (in the same pen) to bed!! A couple of weeks ago I bought a little pullet just a little older than the others. She fits right in!

    Last week I bought an older laying Silkie hen, and after the trouble started!! There are no issues with the younger ones... they just respect her, and she is not aggressive unless they cross that "invisible" line that only chickens can see, and then it's just a light peck.

    Well, my Rooster and the new hen immediately began fighting, which quickly turned into abuse by the Roo!! The little hen no longer has feathers in the middle of her head! DH and I have decided that "Buddy"Roo is trying to figure out how to breed her, but he is horribly rough, and she spends what little time I let them be together now hiding wherever she can wedge herself into, and he stays right there trying to get her out!

    Everybody says let them work it out, but I'm no Newbie to animals in general, and Buddy Roo is obsessed with this hen, and she will not survive if I let it continue. Today I have Little Hen in the adjoining pen by herself, and she is happy, the little flock has finally relaxed, and Buddy Roo is calm.

    My Question is: Will things ever change?? When Buddy Roo grows up and becomes more sexually mature, will he be less rough? His present behavior is totally unacceptable! Please give me your input! He is so sweet to me and his little flock, and I don't want to have to part with him, but hen abuse just won't do!!

    Will it get better?????
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    New Jersey
    The new hen probably fought him for dominance and lost. He now regards her as a competitor rather than a possible mate. I would try removing him from the flock - out of sight for a significant period of time. I think you are correct in your assessment of his behavior as competitive/obsessive. It sounds far above normal pecking order adjustment. The other possibility is to rehome the new hen and keep your original peaceful flock. Good luck at resolving this.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2013
  3. Georgia Nana

    Georgia Nana Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 13, 2011
    Kathleen, Georgia
    Those were my thoughts. I don't think that it is normal behavior, either. I think that that was the reason that the seller was willing to part with this gorgeous little splash hen. I took a big chance, did not think it through or ask enough questions. I don't think that the situation will change, but I WELCOME opinions and comments!

    Isolating Buddy out of sight is not an option. I do not have a place, as my broody pen is occupied by Mommy Welsummer and her brand new chicks. In addition, even when I isolate him in the adjacent pen, he gets depressed and will not eat. He did this when I put the babies that are now "his flock" from the brooder into the pen. I finally had to let him in with them, and after a few dominance pecks, everything was wonderful, and he is in love with them! He did accept the pullet that I added, so I don't think that it is Buddy. He is SO sweet and is my Baby.

    Please, if there are other opinions out there, let me hear them! I would love to keep this older hen, but not at the expense of the health of my little flock, or of her!!

    Thank you so much for your input!
     

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