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Adopted a white homer/wedding release bird... what to do?

Discussion in 'Pigeons and Doves' started by Goosegrrl, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. Goosegrrl

    Goosegrrl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 16, 2015
    Central FL
    My son found a white homer/wedding release 'dove' near his workplace a few days ago. It had no band at all on it. He thought it was actually a white ringneck that had gone astray or been released, but I took a look and it's definitely a pigeon. I informed him on how to care for it temporarily(basic clean water, grit and seed), but upon getting my own hands on it felt how light and thin it was decided that it needs a good bit more care, and at some point an outside flight pen.

    So, little 'Rehab' is moving in with me further out in the country because I have more time and space for the endeavor.
    I've been on other pigeon forums to glean info on medication and worming, bathing, treating for external parasites, and so on. But I'd rather get more info here, if I can, on doing other things like how to get a partner for this bird. Will I ever be able to let it and a partner fly? And talk about types of birds I can partner it with.

    I suspect that the bird is a female, but of course I won't know unless I wait for it to get back to good health and lay eggs. Assuming that it gets back to health relatively quickly, how long should I wait for eggs before I assume it is actually a male? I'm in Florida and have no clue when the lay season begins for pigeons here. As far as a partner, the only pigeons I've found so far have been other adult whites, or what appear to be cheap captive feral looking birds, also adults,with no mention of breed when listed. One of these might be fine with me if I knew it wouldn't immediately vacate the area if it ever got out of its pen. I certainly wouldn't mind paying a bit of money to get a fancier sort of partner though. I do like the ones with the crests about their heads, but prefer clean legs. No worries about breeding mutts, I know how to substitute fake eggs or to use the oddcouple as surrogates.

    The bird seems quite sweet and tame(that may change once it recovers some), but chuffs at me a little when I go to pick it up. I'm sure it will appreciate its new home in my rose garden. Stress free living.

    So, advice on partnering and keeping this little homing washout please... [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2016
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 6, 2014
    Melrose Park Illinois
    I don;t have very much encouraging news for you. If the homer longs to return home, even after a long time will try to return at all effort. I have found this pigeon and after keeping him for over 2 years and feeding and caressing, and providing him with good company. SPLIT WHEN GOT FREEDOM.. [​IMG]
    I then got some pigeons from a breeder and had them until there were lil ones. The little ones had to be homeset and trained to return back to loft. Parents ran away since they were acquired when already adult. Only one of my outsiders decided to stay. Most of the newborn squabs did get homeset.
    Once I had a good group together, they would fly free range and return.
    [​IMG]
    Unfortunately a raccoon was able to get into my loft and I have NO PIGEONS AT CURRENT TIME.[​IMG]


    My suggestion to you is feed your pigeon well so it gets healthy. You can add a partner to try to have mating and pairing up. If they do raise a few sets of little pigeons, they may decide to stay. Pigeons are an interesting pastime hobby. I will rebuild my missing flock this coming spring. It will be back to square one. homesetting the first batch, and so on.
    WISHING YOU BEST AND ASK ALL YOU DON'T KNOW. [​IMG]
     
  3. Its simple, if it lays its a female. If not, wow, its a cock. I am in Key West and get birds headed to Cuba and decide to stay here. If it crows a lot, its a cock. if not,its a hen. I have many good racers, and if you need one, message me at [email protected]. How long should I wait for eggs before I assume it is actually a male? For one thing, if its a male, you are not going to get eggs.
     

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