Adopting a rooster

WhitF

Chirping
Aug 14, 2021
37
188
66
So there’s a free range rooster in my parents subdivision that was kicked out of his yard. I guess they raised a straight run and didn’t rehome the roos, just chucked them out of the yard. So it’s in a very busy neighborhood right in the middle of the city and me and my spouse are thinking of catching him and bringing him to our place (half acre) to live.
My questions are: can he live alone? How do I get him to stay at my house? Do I leave him in a pen for a bit til he gets used to it and then just put him up at night? I’m thinking he can free range in our yard. He is a standard size roo and we currently only have banties.
Thank you for any advice and help!
 

CrazyCochin

❄️Winter is here! ❄️
May 21, 2019
5,245
36,041
901
Washington State, aka The pacific NorthWest
So there’s a free range rooster in my parents subdivision that was kicked out of his yard. I guess they raised a straight run and didn’t rehome the roos, just chucked them out of the yard. So it’s in a very busy neighborhood right in the middle of the city and me and my spouse are thinking of catching him and bringing him to our place (half acre) to live.
My questions are: can he live alone? How do I get him to stay at my house? Do I leave him in a pen for a bit til he gets used to it and then just put him up at night? I’m thinking he can free range in our yard. He is a standard size roo and we currently only have banties.
Thank you for any advice and help!
Yes, he can live alone. Yes, you can leave him in an enclosure, and if you have a house for him to sleep in, place his food and water in there, so he knows to go in there. Also, lock him up at night, and let him out in the morning. Unless you plan to bond deeply with him, then free-ranging during the day will be okay (As long as you understand that he could get eaten).

I have two standard roosters with my main large flock (It contains mainly standard-sized hens and some smaller-sized ones, but not quite bantam small. And we have two purebred bantam-sized hens. Not a problem, as the bigger roosters tend to go for the bigger hens)
 

CrazyCochin

❄️Winter is here! ❄️
May 21, 2019
5,245
36,041
901
Washington State, aka The pacific NorthWest
Yes, he can live alone. Yes, you can leave him in an enclosure, and if you have a house for him to sleep in, place his food and water in there, so he knows to go in there. Also, lock him up at night, and let him out in the morning. Unless you plan to bond deeply with him, then free-ranging during the day will be okay (As long as you understand that he could get eaten).

I have two standard roosters with my main large flock (It contains mainly standard-sized hens and some smaller-sized ones, but not quite bantam small. And we have two purebred bantam-sized hens. Not a problem, as the bigger roosters tend to go for the bigger hens)
We had a standard size mixed breed rooster that would free-range with our runner ducks, (which are now in an enclosure for safety) and yes, we lost him. Don't know exactly what got him, but at least he was happy being able to roam.
 

WhitF

Chirping
Aug 14, 2021
37
188
66
Yes, he can live alone. Yes, you can leave him in an enclosure, and if you have a house for him to sleep in, place his food and water in there, so he knows to go in there. Also, lock him up at night, and let him out in the morning. Unless you plan to bond deeply with him, then free-ranging during the day will be okay (As long as you understand that he could get eaten).

I have two standard roosters with my main large flock (It contains mainly standard-sized hens and some smaller-sized ones, but not quite bantam small. And we have two purebred bantam-sized hens. Not a problem, as the bigger roosters tend to go for the bigger hens)
Ooohhh thank you so much for your response!! Ok this is all good to know! I appreciate it!
 

CrazyCochin

❄️Winter is here! ❄️
May 21, 2019
5,245
36,041
901
Washington State, aka The pacific NorthWest
Ooohhh thank you so much for your response!! Ok this is all good to know! I appreciate it!
Of course! We have at least 10-11 roosters currently, so we know how and where to place them! ;) If you end up with more rosters in the future, of the same size preferably, you can start what's called a bachelor pad pen. It is where multiple bachelor roosters stay, and if you introduce them right, they should live peacefully together!
 

WhitF

Chirping
Aug 14, 2021
37
188
66
Of course! We have at least 10-11 roosters currently, so we know how and where to place them! ;) If you end up with more rosters in the future, of the same size preferably, you can start what's called a bachelor pad pen. It is where multiple bachelor roosters stay, and if you introduce them right, they should live peacefully together!
Oh my stars I did not know I could do that! That’s awesome! And that’s so great you have all the roos! My little bantam roos crack me up!
 

CrazyCochin

❄️Winter is here! ❄️
May 21, 2019
5,245
36,041
901
Washington State, aka The pacific NorthWest
Oh my stars I did not know I could do that! That’s awesome! And that’s so great you have all the roos! My little bantam roos crack me up!
Well, now you do friend! Yep, all chickens we have live and die in the same place, naturally! I have one bantam cochin rooster, and one half Bantam Cochin half standard size Buff Brahma cockerel!
Thank you! 🥰
Of course!
 

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