Aggressive roosters: Problems and solutions

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by pawprint2104, Nov 12, 2010.

  1. pawprint2104

    pawprint2104 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I read the post "Rooster Attack, need advice" and discovered a bunch of wisdom about how to deal with aggressive birds. Biochick posted...I set him up the first day, I carried the bottle under my arm kind of hidden(I want him to think it comes from me not the bottle). When he got to close I let him have it in the face from under my arm. I had it on stream and when he backed off so did I. He really didn't like it and left me alone for a few days. Now every couple of days I arm myself with my spray bottle and test him. I use the bottle lightly because I don't want him to think this is just water and I'm not scared. So far this has worked for me. I, especially, liked this idea. This works, because it is random, discreet, repeated and reinforced. I use it to train my pooches to stay out of the kitchen when I'm cooking. They believe my arm will "spit" at them if they enter the kitchen while I'm there.

    We have aggressive wild turkey issues. To prevent attacks and haze the aggressive birds, I use and recommend carrying a small, inexpensive travel-size umbrella. The collapsible kind that will fit into your pocket. As an aggressive bird approaches, I rapidly pop the umbrella open in their direction, which scares the bajeezus out of them. I pop it repeatedly and walk toward them. Occasionally, one will still attack. In this case, the umbrella serves as a shield for you and the bird targets the umbrella, instead of you. Get an old worn out or used umbrella, because it will get tattered by all the activity.

    A bunch of good ideas were presented in that post, to name a few: Grabbing and holding while disturbing its comb and feathers, water sprayers, plastic rakes (I like the rake instead of the broom, because it has a larger surface area and a better design for safely pinning the offending bird to the ground), and a host of others.

    Are there any other solutions (short of culling) for hazing aggressive birds not mentioned here?
     
  2. Mtn Cur

    Mtn Cur Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Selective breeding is a good start. If you have already have a problem short of culling, handling the rooster or turkey is the only way until submission. I would fix him for thanksgiving and start over if it were my problem. The umbrella is a barrier, not a solution to the real problem.
     
  3. Yazzo

    Yazzo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Nov 12, 2010
  4. pawprint2104

    pawprint2104 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, the umbrellas is only to guard against an aggressive bird. Although it serves as protection and may frighten some birds, it doesn't induce docility. It may be useful for those who can't handle the birds and want to go into their chicken area free from fear.
     
  5. pawprint2104

    pawprint2104 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Yes, they are supposed to be wild and fear humans. [​IMG] But, unfortunately, here on the left coast, well-meaning folks feed the wild ones which acclimates them to being in close proximity with us. [​IMG] They learn to see us as food dispensers, then approach looking for food, or to guard their own food source. When human vs. wild turkey conflict arises, such as, a mother walking with her child attacked by a resident wild turkey, the turkey eventually loses. A pest control company arrives and removes it (sometimes they get the wrong ones) from the neighborhood. It's been taught to see us as equals, loses its fear, and becomes a wildlife hazard to those who don't know how to deal with them.

    Oh [​IMG] Great link! I got a quick look at it. Definitely good ideas. I think that pretty much says it all. Didn't know it was here. Pardon me. I'm still kinda new here.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2010
  6. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Amen to selective breeding. Aggressive roosters beget aggressive sons. Cull such roosters from the breeding program. The least human aggressive rooster is the gamecock. Human aggressiveness has been stringently culled against because of the danger it would present in this breed. Selective breeding does work over a period of time.
     

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