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Am I creating a problem?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by dragonchick, Nov 16, 2009.

  1. dragonchick

    dragonchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 30, 2007
    I may have to re think where I want to put my rabbitry since I also have goats. While doing my research on rabbits I found there are a lot of diseases that can pass from one to another. The goats pen runs along side where I want to put the rabbits and the goat house is approx 15ft to the side. This is a dry area so there is no water runoff so that's not a concern. I am more thinking about airborne problems and track through since this is a dirt floored area. There is no way I can build up the floor to make it non dirt. Any suggestions or concerns I should know about? And no I do not have another place I can put them permanently. IF I get the rabbits sooner than I had planned they will be housed on my back porch but this is only temporary. I want rabbits but I dont want to endanger my goats.
     
  2. miss_thenorth

    miss_thenorth Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 28, 2007
    SW Ont, Canada
    What diseases can pass from one to the other? Just curious. I have my rabbits, chickens, quail and horses all in the same very small barn. Soon to add sheep or goats to our farm.
     
  3. Skyesrocket

    Skyesrocket Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 20, 2008
    I have had rabbits in the barn with goats for years with no probelms. The goats even get under the rabbit hutches and eat spilled pellets and hay.
    What can the rabbits spread to the goats? Just curious.
     
  4. feathersgalore

    feathersgalore Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 4, 2008
    Central Ohio
    My rabbits share a barn with my goats and have for several years without problems. The rabbits are on one side and the goats on another.
     

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