Any type of medication good for a pecked back?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by buffsandbarn, Jul 25, 2016.

  1. buffsandbarn

    buffsandbarn New Egg

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    Jun 5, 2016
    Austin, TX
    Hi - I'm new to raising chickens and only have 5. I acquired 2 out of the 5 just yesterday and one of them has a bare back, neck, and tail from other chickens pecking on her. When I introduced her to my 3 other girls, they turned from the nice gentle hens I know and love to monsters that started pecking the new chicken! Is there anything I can use on her back/neck to promote healing? I read about Blu Kote and also about separating out the one getting pecked on, but is there anything I can use that would help her skin? I don't think she was very well taken care of in her previous home. Please let me know your suggestions. I'm in Austin, TX.
    Thank you!
    Sharon
     
  2. ZuzuP123

    ZuzuP123 Just Hatched

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    Jul 25, 2016
    Hello. As a very expierienced chicken owner, I know very well that pecking can be a problem. Get her away from the other chickens, and keep her around you for a while. After she heals, and is ready to go back in with them, I have some tips for you:

    Before just placing her in with different animals, place a cage or pen of some sort in the other chicken's enviorment and put her in there. They will start to get used to each other, and soon they will hopefully be fine. But always keep a watchful eye that she is not being pecked on, or being out ruled by the others.

    Another thing you could do is get some more chickens to be on the hurt chickens side, so that when you are ready to place her with the other flock, she has more chickens, and they set the new pecking order. Almost like they are then the new leaders. You always want more chickens in the new flock than the older flock, so that they overrule the other, older chickens.
     
  3. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    Can you post some photos?

    You may want to separate her with the other chicken you acquired for a quarantine period. Even though you put them with your girls, a couple of weeks separation (ideally away from your flock) is best, that way you can monitor them for any illnesses/disease, mite/lice and worms. It's also easier to treat any issues that arise before you start an introduction period.

    For large areas/wounds Vetericyn spray works well, Blu Kote is a good antiseptic so if that is what you have you can use that if there are no deep wounds. For potection from the sun you may want to put a chicken saddle/hen apron on her to protect delicate skin. If she's been plucked, she most likely won't grow feathers back until she goes through a molt, so depending on her age it may be a while.

    As far a integration, as previously suggested, a see-but-don't-touch method is a good idea. Caging her or splitting the run if you can will allow the new chickens to be seen, but not attacked. Even when your hens get used to them being around and you let them be all together, there will be some drama, pecking, posturing, etc., as long as no blood is being drawn try to let them work out the pecking order without interference. It's hard to watch, but that is the life/culture of chickens.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2016
  4. buffsandbarn

    buffsandbarn New Egg

    5
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    Jun 5, 2016
    Austin, TX
    OK, thank you for the advice. She doesn't have any wounds and is not bleeding. She just doesn't have feathers on pretty much her entire back, under her wings. She came from another home with over 30 chickens, so she must have been pretty pecked on there.
    Thank you again!
     
  5. buffsandbarn

    buffsandbarn New Egg

    5
    1
    9
    Jun 5, 2016
    Austin, TX
    She has one chicken on her side and she is the biggest one. I have a way to separate in my coop and will keep doing that. Thank you for your advice!
     
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