Are my duck eggs safe to eat?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Daglebagel, Jun 14, 2019.

  1. room onthebroom

    room onthebroom Animal-a-holic

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    Interesting! :thumbsup Keep us posted on what works for you & if you ever decide to start a thread on 'Experimenting with frozen eggs' please tag me.
     
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  2. Duckworth

    Duckworth Songster

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    I’ll try to remember! All I can say for now is that the frozen eggs pop out of the soap mold without any problems at all. I fit 24 frozen egg hearts into a gallon freezer bag, press out most of the air and move them to the basement freezer.
     
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  3. ducklvr3

    ducklvr3 Chirping

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    Does anyone know how long you can store eggs in your fridge if you take the egg in the morning that she laid the night before and place in Tupperware in fridge?

    Her eggs are dirty!
    I googled cleaning duck eggs and it said if you wash the egg you take off the protective layer called a micro something ???
     
  4. Duckworth

    Duckworth Songster

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    The bloom is the protective coating on the outside of the shell. If you wash off your eggs, they need to be refrigerated afterward. They will keep for quite a while. Store bought chicken eggs are washed and they last for weeks. I rotate my eggs in cartons in the fridge on a first in-first out basis. I always put the narrow end down and the fat (air sac) end up to help the egg retain its natural structure inside.

    If I think my eggs may have been in the carton for too long, I submerge them in a cup or bowl of water. If they float, I discard them. If they remain on the bottom, but the large end rises so they are sitting on end, they are getting close to being discarded. If I have a bunch that aren’t in cartons, I do the float test on all of them, discard any floaters, hard boil any that stand on end, and put the rest of them in cartons according to which ones lie the most horizontally on the bottom of the water container, using the tipped eggs first. After the bloom is gone, the eggshell becomes more porous and air enters the egg little by little. Thus, the float test as an easy way to determine relative freshness.
     
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  5. ducklvr3

    ducklvr3 Chirping

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    Thank you for explaining this to me!!!
    I like that i can trust you and not go on what someone said on google!
     
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  6. Duckworth

    Duckworth Songster

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    I learned from other people here by asking the same kinds of questions you are asking. If an egg isn’t dirty, it doesn’t have to be washed, though I do wash all of my eggs before I crack them, if not before, as a food safety practice. I also wash my hands with antibacterial soap after handling eggs or anything to do with my ducks. Salmonella is always a risk with birds, reptiles, and eggs, even store-bought eggs, so careful hygiene is just good practice.
     
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  7. room onthebroom

    room onthebroom Animal-a-holic

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    :goodpost: Exactly! I do the exact same things. The only thing I do different is I write the date on the fat end of the egg. This makes it easier to aim for the older eggs to boil. (Nothing more frustrating than trying to peel a freshly laid boiled egg.)

    I wash my eggs. I tell anybody we give them to that they are washed & need to be kept in the fridge & I hammer into them the float trick too. Even washed my (refrigerated) chicken & duck eggs are usually good for about 6wks. I find my quail eggs go bad much quicker than that.
     
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