Are roosters and newly hatched chicks okay together?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by huntbritto, Jun 7, 2014.

  1. huntbritto

    huntbritto In the Brooder

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    My black langshan hen is sitting on two eggs and they do have chicks in them. Due to hatch next week. Do I need to worry about the other hen or the two roosters hurting the chicks? Should I separate the mama and her babies?
     
  2. CocoPopz

    CocoPopz Chirping

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    Some people tend to separate the mum and babies, whereas other people just keep an eye on them, there's no promise that they won't hurt the chicks, but if the mum hen is protective, the other hens and roosters will know they cant hurt them, as she'll tell them if they touch her chicks. If you want to give it a go, when they hatch you could keep a very close eye on them to make sure she's protecting them properly, if the rooster really show aggression towards the chicks, then separate. But do expect the odd peck as they'll want to know what they are, if they're anything like my flock, they'll be nosey. Like I said, if they show true aggression, like in it to kill it, towards them then separate. Do you know where the hen stands in pecking order in your flock? If she's one of the top, then there's more of a chance they won't come near them than they would if she was lowest ranking, but you'll be surprised how protective and aggressive a mum hen can be! Good luck, it's a lot easier if they're good together lol
     
  3. TomGallopavo

    TomGallopavo Songster

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    I separate mine (mom and babies) in a run that has a dog house in it...after they hatch. I can lock them up at night in the run and in the house. Works nicely. After about two or three days I let them out of the run unless it will rain. They go back in at night of course. When mom quits we move them into the coop. Our cock is gentle and nice, you can pick him up and he never bothers my little girls (humans). He generally seems uninterested unless I put food down. How is yours? The danger around here comes from the other hens and mom stepping on them and such. We have lost a chick or two each year and hatch twenty or so from our self sustaining flock. We have had two seven chick broodies this Spring and only lost one chick...we never found anything, it was just gone. I suppose BillyBob could have eaten it...but I seriously doubt it. Since you only have two you might be extra cautious. We have another hen sitting on three eggs. She is old and ate two of the eggs early on but has not messed with the three that are left. This morning two were peeping so she might have at least two. She is due Monday but they always come a day or two early. We pretty much wing it...our chickens have a great life and if we lose some that is part of it. We eat the roos of course when they start to harass everyone. The coop and run are very secure, we can control that. They free range all day and there is danger in that. Eventually I will fence them in a large yard.....good luck with your chicks!
     
  4. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    When everyone is confined I like to have rooster separate from hen and chicks. Seldom does rooster act aggressively but he does accidently trample chicks and he is an additional source of parasites (cocci). Free-range is a very different story where trampling is not such an issue and he can help locate food reducing conflict for needing to eat versus need for brooding, especially when everything is cold and wet. Rooster can also enhance survival if Coopers Hawks are otherwise pressuring flock. For me, a hen with a rooster a around gets a higher percentage of hatched chicks to reach weaning stage.
     
  5. One Chick Two

    One Chick Two Songster

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    Some roosters will take over parental duties even. (Look up broody rooster)

    We had feared last year that our OEGB roo might be mean toward our new RIR babies. Couldn't be further from the truth.
    He really liked the little ones, doted on them, and helped to raise them (even the cockerels) to act well in a flock. Even now, the tiny bantam rules the roost and the grown RIR look up to him, and straightens them out when they are not acting well. lol. It's all going to depend on the rooster, the flock and momma hen. Best of luck!!!
     
  6. CocoPopz

    CocoPopz Chirping

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    Agreed
    Not all roosters are evil, you get some very motherly ones lol, mines a big softy and I trust my hen and chicks around him, he stays with her and the chicks, it's never been a problem, you'd need to asses the situation when they've hatched, they might be cool or they might be horrible
     
  7. centrarchid

    centrarchid Free Ranging

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    The other hen is most likely to be problematic if she is dominant to the hen with chicks.
     

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