ASAP HELP: RABBIT NEST RELOCATION

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by tacothechicken, Jun 24, 2019.

  1. tacothechicken

    tacothechicken Songster

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    Hey guys so normally i leave it be but my dogs found a rabbits nest and id ignore it but the babies are the most infested babies ive ever seen and I ended up trying to bath them and remove around 95% of the fleas although I suspect some larvea are hidden in fur. Now I need to know will mom take them from a differnt location? The nest is so infested its impossible to but them back and not have them die of anemia! If I put them I a bowl whith grass will she fetch them? They're old enough to see and call but they're so weak only one of 4 can really stand as it should at it's age. Should I just call a wildlife rehabber? Or will mom move them to a new location once she finds them?? If they go back in the original nest they'll die for sure :(
     
  2. Eggscaping

    Eggscaping Enjoying Life!

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    Unlikely. Mother rabbits are pretty easy to terrify off a nest. Especially if you have washed them...now they don't smell like her litter.
    Once, ages ago, we accidentally stepped into a nest in deep grass...heard the baby we actually stepped on squeaking and took it out...it died as it was held...and we carefully pushed the grass over the nest and LEFT - hoping the mother would take care of the others. Sadly, when we went back the next day the mother hadn't returned - the babies were weak with dehydration. We took them then, to try to save them but the litter died. It was horrible.
    Their best bet now is to find a wildlife rehab place that can take them. But mother rabbits aren't cats...they won't take babies that have been 'too' disturbed...especially with a new scent.
    You did something that I totally understand...trying to help the poor little things. Hugs to you for that! You're a kind person. But in my experience, their only chance is to get them to someone whose business it is to rehab baby animals, and know the right formula, and how to see to them.
    Good luck!!!!
     
  3. tacothechicken

    tacothechicken Songster

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    @Eggscaping ugh I know that would be the answer but I wanted to try :( I'm fully aware of how impossible to raise wild rabbits are even whith no experience if it was a nest of birds id have no issue but thats as far as id go(I'm def. not for keeping wild animals as pets, and ive successfully released 8 of baby birds of 13 into the wild to have them return the following year but I would much rather not be involved at all I have plenty of my own thanks!!) Not sure how willing our rehabbers would be to take them unfortunately ive found most are about leaving them to die or euthanizing depending on circumstances Im sure they kill any invasive birds brought in if overcrowded(house sparrows etc.). I turned in a barn swallow fledgling that injured a wing to our nearest rehabber 3 hrs away but based on the follow up I suspect it was euthanized based on that the was wound most likely caused by a cat and was to much energy :( .) I'll contact the rehab facility on the nearest island and see thier opinion and maybe by some kitten formula but I have very few expectations, only 'good' thing about this is I know they are literally worse off being put back in the nest and our niebors shoot the rabbit nests! which is why there's 3 females who all raise thier babies in our yard yearly! cause our dogs keep away predators as long as mom can keep away the dogs. Well see what happens but 2 of the babies are clearly anemic and only one of 4 is mobile as it should be, plus I'm sure their's still some larvae hiding out feasting away :/
     
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  4. SurferchickinSB

    SurferchickinSB Crowing

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    Yes, I would probably just contact a wildlife rescue and let them care for the baby bunnies.That is probably their best chance for survival from what you have described
     
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  5. Eggscaping

    Eggscaping Enjoying Life!

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    We worked for one summer as volunteers for Audubon Wildlife Center here in Portland...mostly feeding baby birds (it was springtime/summer). If someone brought in an invasive bird (starling, house sparrow, pigeon) they euthanized it, yes. Not because it was too much work, but because the invasive kinds will destroy a songbird's nest and take it for their own. The invasive species are thriving, whereas our native songbirds are often in decline. Hard to see? Yes...but I understand why, and have to support it.
    I also understand your pain, and can't fault you for doing what your compassionate nature urges you to do. Do the best you can, and if the babies pass on - at least you tried, and if you keep them warm and protected it will give them some comfort and they won't have a weasel or crow eating them alive.
    I would still try to find a wildlife place though. Try looking to see if there's an Audubon Center near you. And again...I wish you the best of luck.
     
  6. tacothechicken

    tacothechicken Songster

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    Thanks for the info! The nearest wildlife rehabber is (literally) on another island lol. I'll call them when they open and see if i can arrange a pick up. Got the babies to urinate and defecate, to prevent toxifying luckily (raised pet rats in the past) but two are definitely hungry so hopefully they'll last till morning as I know you can only supplement VERY SPECIFiC formula for bunnies :/ @Eggscaping thanks for the info but we don't have a nearby Audubon so the island over will have to do :) ps. I'm well aware of the fact housparrows and such kill chicks and eggs (I actually started a swallow and Martin colony on our prop. around 2 years back and it attracted some less welcome house sparrows since ) but does the fact that they're of wild origin mean they cant be adopted out? Or is it simply a risk factor? I'd assume you could adopt them out to be pets or is there just to many to concievably handle? I love the starlings cause they keep look out for the hawks and ours only choose specific nesting boxes that the swallows don't like so I can keep both no issue(plus the starlings learn to mimic the frogs, hawks, and us to name a few, so They're quite fun), the house sparrows are awfull though! They breed faster than rats! And they're aggressive and messy. Still, on curious on you're opinion :)
     
  7. Fishkeeper

    Fishkeeper Crowing

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    If you find a baby animal with a severe parasite infestation, then something is wrong with it, and you need to take it to a rehabber. The mother should keep them clean.

    Most people aren't equipped to keep most species of birds as pets. Chickens are different, they don't need to fly. To adopt out a house sparrow, you'd have to find someone willing to maintain an aviary large enough to keep them happy, plus enrichment, and I don't think there are many people who'd do that. They're wild animals, after all, they aren't well suited for captivity.
    Also, there are only so many resources. Money and time are limited, so rehabbers need to focus on native animals. If all the invasive birds in the US died off, that would be a good thing. Better an orphaned house sparrow be euthanized than die of starvation, anyway.

    Any decent rehab place shouldn't kill an animal just because of a cat bite. With antibiotic treatment, they have a good chance at survival. If they're already showing enough signs of infection that they're unlikely to survive, that's one thing, but a cat bite isn't guaranteed to be fatal when treated properly.
     
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  8. MochaDuck

    MochaDuck Songster

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  9. Eggscaping

    Eggscaping Enjoying Life!

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    Well, here's the deal: There is only so much 'resources' for wild birds to eat...and with tree cutting and brush clearing, only so many nesting sites. Starlings are pretty, yes...with their lovely spots and purple sheen in the feathers. And fun to listen to when they mimic other birds and even mechanical devices like doorbells. House (English) sparrows are cheeky too. I love pigeons' iridescent colors as well. But then...I'm incredibly soft-hearted. If I could just send the invasives back to their own land of origin, I'd be happy with that...BUT since I can't, I have to look the other way when the rehabbers put them down. I'll take martins, robins, bluebirds, towhees, Oregon juncos, goldfinches - and on and on - over starlings, house sparrows, and any other invasive species.
    Could you adopt them out? I suppose so...but is the adopter going to get tired of them and release them? Let them go accidentally? Are there even people who WANT cages full of starlings or sparrows?
    I know it's hard. I hate to kill things. I love to fish - and eat what I catch - but I feel sorry to take the lives and whisper a sincere "sorry...thank you" to every fish I bop on the head. You, of course, have to do what you feel right with. You have to be you, as I have to be me...and feel good about who you are at the end of the day.
    But I can't see anyone watching the numbers of songbirds...who belong here...declining - and rehabbing and releasing the invasive species.
    I'm long-winded, please excuse my rambling. You seem a good person - I'm glad to have 'spoken' to you. (*hug*)
     
    tacothechicken likes this.
  10. A_Fowl_Guy

    A_Fowl_Guy Pig Whisperer

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    The kits were most likely abandoned already if they were that infested. An animal rehab probably will not have anything to help the kits. If I seen them in that state I personally would have left them as nature was taking its course no matter how cruel you think it is. Remember, animals focus on survival.
     

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