assisting a hatch...(duckling) UPDATE! Page 2

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by bearfeet3, Apr 25, 2009.

  1. bearfeet3

    bearfeet3 Out Of The Brooder

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    How long after an external pip should it take for the chick to break free. I have a ducking that pipped about a day and a half ago but has made no progress. It's still cheeping and moving but nothing. When would you normally assist? The membrane looks white and dry. When should I assist if need be.

    (I dont care for your let nature take it's course theories...this is a domesticated duck, hatching in an incubator with a human parent, mother nature flew out the window on this one way back)
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2009
  2. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    What breed of duck is it?
     
  3. bearfeet3

    bearfeet3 Out Of The Brooder

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    crested blue swedish...i already lost one to a skull deformity, i dont want to lose this one [​IMG]
     
  4. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:If it pipped a day and a half ago, I would help out now. Especially if the membrane is white.
     
  5. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    This is what I wrote about helping ducks hatch. I wrote it for call ducklings, but basically this is how you help any duckling out.

    Once the duckling pips through the air sac, I wait around 14-18 hours, and if there is no pip through the shell, I make a small hole in the large end of the egg so that the duckling can breathe. The air hitting the membrane also stimulates the yolk sac to absorb, and the veins to dry up.
    Then I wait another 6-12 hours. If I hear the peeping of the duckling starting to slow down, or not pip as vigorously as it was, then I will help earlier. Then I slowly, using my fingernail or a toothpick, start to break off the large end of the egg. If you see any bright red blood, STOP. Put the duckling back into the incubator, and wait 3-4 hours before starting up again. Once you get the large end of the egg off, you will be able to see the membrane. If it looks rubbery and white, then take some q-tips soaked in warm water, and wet the membrane down. If the veins in the membrane look full with blood, put the duckling back, and wait another 3 hours. Keep repeating until the veins are almost all empty.
    Once the veins are mostly gone, I proceed to slowly stretch the membrane over the egg, so that the duckling is free from the membrane. Then I slowly, and gently, take the ducklings head and pop it out of the shell. Then I stick the duckling, still in the shell, back into the incubator, for him to finish the hatching process himself.
    Sometimes this is necessary, especially with show quality call ducklings. Since the ducklings have short necks, large round heads, and tiny beaks, sometimes the only thing that they can do is break the air sac, and then they need help getting the rest of the way out.


    Also, when I help call ducklings hatch, I add some vitamins and electrolytes to their water for the first 2 or 3 days.
     
  6. 4-H chicken mom

    4-H chicken mom Overrun With Chickens

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  7. Shanay235

    Shanay235 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It can take 48+ hours for them to hatch after pipping. Since it's been 1 1/2 days with no progress, if it were my duckling, I'd probably start helping.
     
  8. bearfeet3

    bearfeet3 Out Of The Brooder

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    thank you soo much, you made my day...its hard to find info on this [​IMG]
     
  9. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:I have heard that too, the 48+ hours, but I have never had a duckling take more than 24 hours to get out of the shell.
     
  10. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:your welcome. [​IMG] Good Luck and let us know how it goes.
     

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