BALD EAGLES NESTING ON MY PROPERTY

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by scratch'n'peck, Feb 21, 2015.

  1. alldembirds

    alldembirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    they nest out buy our property every year when they migrate, I guess I take them for granted because I see them yearly, they are pretty, a couple weeks ago we counted 9 on one of our drives
     
  2. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    Oh yeah, I've read that there are areas around the Southern Mississippi River that have a lot of Bald Eagles, and they really gather together when they migrate. I have barely seen any in the wild. But I've heard that some are starting to spend the whole year around the Great Lakes.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
  3. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    Every evening I check on my chickens in their coop (with big attached covered chicken run BTW) before sunset and lately I come inside and sit at the front window to watch for the roosting BEs. The pine tree where they built their nest is about 200 feet from the house, but if there were leaves on the the old oaks and maples, I would not be able to see the nest from the window. However in the winter I can see the forest of branches silhouetted against the evening sky. I wait to see a Bald Eagle swooping near the horizon. They come from the Rogue River and typically alight on the nest. The first eagle lands on the nest, and then I will wait for the second eagle - sometimes just moments after, other times several minutes later. Usually after a few minutes one of them will take off from the nest and land on one of their favorite roosting branches. Their most frequented branch is in a tall oak about 20 feet away from the nest. They have another favorite roost that is a couple hundred feet away, and occasionally they will roost in the pine tree where their nest is. The first eagle will wait on the branch and perhaps do a bit of preening. The second will land several minutes later and it is not unusual to hear some Bald Eagle chatter and see some flapping. I'm not quick enough with the binoculars to tell if they are mating.

    On February 22, I settled down to watch for roosting time. As usual one swoops down and lands on the nest then the other one comes gliding in and lands. The two do what they do in the nest and one after the other settle on the nearby roost. I continue watching as the light fades. Then about ten minutes later a third Bald Eagle flies in and lands on the nest. In the low light I can only see the silhouette, but with the size and shape of the wings, it is clearly a Bald Eagle, however, I can't make out the color of the head. The third eagle only spends a minute on the nest and then flies to the roost where the others are. At least one eagle then flaps its wings and lifts off the branch, and a moment later one of the eagles flies from the roost and lands on a tree closer to the nest where I don't have a clear view. A couple of minutes pass and one of the two remaining on the roost flies off to a branch in the nesting tree. As my eyes follow that eagle, I realize it flew to join the eagle that originally fled the roost because I can see the outline of two eagles in the pine tree. Finally the last eagle takes off from the roost lands in the nesting tree. Then the three eagles seem to play a game of pick a perch in the nesting tree. In the low light it is impossible to keep track of which bird is which, but I can see the dark figures against the sky moving from one branch to another in that pine tree.

    The following evening I wait to see who will land on the nest and roost. Two eagles in quick succession alight on the nest. They spend a few minutes up there together. The first eagle takes off and flies to the more distant favorite roost where it is difficult for me to see it clearly. The second eagle spends several more minutes in the nest but chooses to roost in the nest tree. I watch for about a half hour as it gets darker and darker, but I can only see one eagle roosting in the nesting tree. No more swooping eagles in view for the night.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
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  4. 21hens-incharge

    21hens-incharge True BYC Addict

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    Way better than anything on tv for sure. You have quite a nature show going for you!
    Thank you for sharing the story.

    Babs
     
  5. Honey B

    Honey B Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow! What a special opportunity. Glad you are enjoying it. I look forward to your updates [​IMG]
     
  6. b.hromada

    b.hromada Flock Mistress

    That is so awesome! You're very lucky! Enjoy them! [​IMG]
     
  7. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

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    The Bald Eagle pair has been spending more time during the day near the nest. I have not seen the third eagle since Feb. 22, the pair might have chased the third off and are now getting more serious about the impending egg lay. It was the coldest February on record in West Michigan and the Rogue River is practically frozen over. The Eagle pair probably are eating a lot of squirrel... "Oh no squirrel again?!" she says, "What I wouldn't give for a nice juicy fish." A broody Bald Eagle typically lays 2 eggs.

    I have kept up with a couple of the eagle nest cameras to learn more about eagle habits. Here is a still shot from http://berry.edu/eaglecam/nest2/ from last week. The eagles lay their eggs at least a month earlier in Georgia.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017
  8. 21hens-incharge

    21hens-incharge True BYC Addict

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    Still following and enjoying this thread. I am glad you can enjoy them in person. Super cool!
     
  9. Suzie

    Suzie Overrun With Chickens

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    I am utterly enthralled with your thread...I have been watching the berry.edu link...seen it ten times over and it is incredible..thanks for sharing! I am going to call my cousin in Wauwatosa and ask if she has seen any Bald Eagles nesting in her area...W. Michigan is so beautiful...!
     
  10. NickyKnack

    NickyKnack Love is Silkie soft!

    So beautiful! The baby is so tiny. :)
     

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