Bantam Duck Page

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Robert Blosl, Oct 16, 2010.

  1. duckluck

    duckluck Dulcimyrh Ducks

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    Illinois
    Quote:They are a different duck, but they are a Bantam duck breed.
     
  2. easttxchick

    easttxchick Lone Star Call Ducks

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    Quote:Anyone, anyone??? Where's Turbo? I need to know what's gonna hatch out of this egg? If it has half the personality of it's mother, it's gonna be a keeper! [​IMG]
     
  3. linda_zeagler31002

    linda_zeagler31002 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Adrian, Georgia
    Walt are you ignoring me?? You have not answered some of my replies, but I did order from Lee Morey, he contacted me yesterday, so I am going to have a actual pair of his calls that I know for sure are his bloodlines now, weeeeee [​IMG] I am a blessed women in deed. [​IMG]


    Quote:
     
  4. fowlman01

    fowlman01 Overrun With Chickens

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    Sonoma County CA
    Quote:
    What would you like me to answer? I don't read every post here......don't have the time

    Walt
     
  5. 19hhbelgian

    19hhbelgian Pigs DO Fly!!

    Apr 9, 2009
    New Tripoli PA
    I have my ducks inside our shed right now, and got 2 eggs [​IMG] the shed is cold, but above freezing, just enough to not worry about the water freezing. My question is, is it worth trying to hatch the eggs? I thought my duck had decided to set, but tonight she wasn't on them, and they were cold. They were just layed yesterday and today. Thanks [​IMG]
     
  6. CityChicker

    CityChicker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Anyone, anyone??? Where's Turbo? I need to know what's gonna hatch out of this egg? If it has half the personality of it's mother, it's gonna be a keeper! [​IMG]

    It depends on a couple different factors, but probably all Gray or Gray Pied. It depends on whether or not your Gray Pied is heterozygous (one copy of the gene) or homozygous (two copies) for the Pied/Runner pattern gene. It is incompletely dominant, so if your bird is heterozygous, 50% will have the pied pattern and the other 50% won't. If your bird is homozygous, which should be somewhat obvious depending on the amount of white, than 100% of the offspring will appear Gray Pied (obviously with one copy of the gene since the other parent is not Pied).

    Appleyard is created by the combination of recessive light phase and restricted Mallard. The light phase won't show in the first generation when mated to a Gray unless the off chance the Gray is split for light phase (impossible to know without knowing its' history). The restricted Mallard should show in the first generation if your Appleyard carries restricted Mallard, but lots of Appleyard calls do not.

    I hope this helps. The short answer is that you will probably get Gray and Gray Pied. If you mate those birds together, you will then get Gray, Gray Pied, Appleyard, and Pied Appleyard.
     
  7. CityChicker

    CityChicker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Duckluck- Sorry for the late reply... yes, I have thought of maybe doing a book or booklet. I just have not taken the time to seriously pursue it. Maybe some day!

    MrsTurbo- The reason you sometimes get Apricot Silver in a line of Butterscotch would be because some of the breeder birds must carry dusky and/or harlequin phase, which would not be terribly surprising since they supposedly have some Snowy in their early history. There are probably some that pop up that appear to be Apricot Silver, but are not exactly the correct genotype though also. I have worked with that genotype a lot now since I have been working with the Holderread's Overbergs for a couple years now and the birds we know for sure are pure for Apricot Silver (harlequin phase dusky with double blue dilution) are a LOT lighter than a lot of the Calls I have seen labeled as Apricot Silver. The hens especially. Hens that are pure for that color are usually almost solid white. We hatched out a huge number of them last year and they are all carbon copies of each other. That makes me think a lot of the Apricot Silver calls are actually split for dusky or harlequin phase or maybe even light phase. All of that is pretty explainable based on the history of the colors involved.

    I hope that explanation helps! I would love to get some of your Butters some day. All the other birds we have from you guys are just beautiful. They have been great additions to our flock.
     
  8. easttxchick

    easttxchick Lone Star Call Ducks

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    Quote:Anyone, anyone??? Where's Turbo? I need to know what's gonna hatch out of this egg? If it has half the personality of it's mother, it's gonna be a keeper! [​IMG]

    It depends on a couple different factors, but probably all Gray or Gray Pied. It depends on whether or not your Gray Pied is heterozygous (one copy of the gene) or homozygous (two copies) for the Pied/Runner pattern gene. It is incompletely dominant, so if your bird is heterozygous, 50% will have the pied pattern and the other 50% won't. If your bird is homozygous, which should be somewhat obvious depending on the amount of white, than 100% of the offspring will appear Gray Pied (obviously with one copy of the gene since the other parent is not Pied).

    Appleyard is created by the combination of recessive light phase and restricted Mallard. The light phase won't show in the first generation when mated to a Gray unless the off chance the Gray is split for light phase (impossible to know without knowing its' history). The restricted Mallard should show in the first generation if your Appleyard carries restricted Mallard, but lots of Appleyard calls do not.

    I hope this helps. The short answer is that you will probably get Gray and Gray Pied. If you mate those birds together, you will then get Gray, Gray Pied, Appleyard, and Pied Appleyard.

    Wow, thanks for that CityChicker!
    Would you mind telling me what a Gray x Silver Appleyard would produce?
    Sorry to bug you, but this information is HARD to come by!
     
  9. CityChicker

    CityChicker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You're welcome. The Gray x Silver Appleyard would produce the same thing I said above minus the information for Pied. Presuming your bird does not carry restricted Mallard (as I said, a lot of Appleyard Calls do not) you should get all Gray in the first generation. If you mate those birds together, you should get 75% Gray and 25% Appleyard. On the off chance your Appleyard does carry the restricted genes, the first generation should all be restricted Mallard rather than the regular wild-type Mallard (Gray). Restricted Mallard and wild-type look very similar in the adult plumage, just with the restricted Mallard having some areas of excess white.

    ***As a side note, when I use "Appleyard" in the context of Calls, I am using it rather loosely because most of them I have seen have actually just been light phase wild-type (aka "Trout") rather than light phase restricted Mallard. In the adult plumage though, they look almost identical to the true Appleyard color. As ducklings though, they look very different. The birds that carry restricted Mallard are yellow with a dark mohawk. The birds that only carry light phase are almost indistinguishable from Gray. They typically just have more areas of yellow down, especially connecting the dorsal spots.
     
  10. easttxchick

    easttxchick Lone Star Call Ducks

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    You know, Citychicker-you really should compile your genetics genius and charge for it.
    There are so few people that truly can comprehend the color breeding/genetics of the Calls and would gladly pay for the information come spring breeding time!
    You have a vast wealth of information and apparently, the brain to understand all of the scary mathematical looking formulas involved in color breeding! [​IMG]
     

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