Behavior, is it ok? If not, what do I do

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by eggcited2, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. eggcited2

    eggcited2 Songster

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    Was setting out with chickens and tommy. He came up and walked past several times, tail fanned, feathers fluffed. He got closer and closer with each pass. Pressed his chest against my leg once. Walked back and forth some more. Then he picked at the hem of my tee-shirt. Would pick at it or any loose wrinkle in my jeans. Did not hit hard, just grabbed, and would pull some. When his beak would slip off, could hear it "clack" together.

    Was the picking and pulling an ok behavior? If is wasn't and was an aggressive or other such behavior I should stop: how do I stop it?

    Don't know what he was doing (challenging me? accepting me? just curious about me?).
     

  2. Dogfish

    Dogfish Rube Goldberg incarnate

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    He's got a crush on you.
     
  3. Lol I was just looking for curiosity. Now I know what that is if I ever get turkeys.
     
  4. Sir Birdaholic

    Sir Birdaholic Night Knight

    Male turkeys will chest bump each other, & grab the others neck & hang on for dear life when they challenge each other. If a male starts challenging you, it could lead to spurring, & an agressive tom is HARD to break. Hopefully yours was just curious.
     
  5. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Crowing

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    Personally, regardless of his motives, I would not tolerate the behavior. Maybe he's just curious, but that's a big maybe and the alternative is dangerous. I don't care if they strut in my presence as long as they keep their distance, focus on their girls, and if I want to walk through where he's at he better move. He should yield to my dominance always.
     
  6. Quote:I agree with that 100%. They are alot like kids [​IMG] If they think they can push you around they will.

    Steve
     
  7. eggcited2

    eggcited2 Songster

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    Thanks for the info and warnings. Today he was much more bold and even lifted his foot and pawed at me (my leg) with it. He also pecked my hand for the first time ever. He started out soft, but got harder. I would push him away. All this happened while I was setting.

    If I put my hand close enough for me to initiate touching, he would move away. If I stood up he would move away, and when I walked towards him he would move off. But I did notice that when I went to walk away (with my back to him) he would run towards me. When I'd turn around, he would stop.

    What should I do to show dominance and to not let him get aggressive towards me? What movements, actions, etc????
     

  8. Don't sit down. During mating the hens will lay down for the tom. He thinks you are wanting to mate. Keep yourself taller than he is and by reaching out to touch him you are showing dominance since he is moving away. When you move towards him make sure you don't corner him, always leave him a way to get away.

    Steve
     
  9. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Crowing

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    Quote:Agreed. I will also add that when he rushes you when you turn your back don't just turn around so he stops, turn around and chase him off. Don't just stop the behavior, show him that the behavior is WRONG and will result consequences for him. He's testing his boundaries. Set them firmly.
     
  10. Lagerdogger

    Lagerdogger Songster

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    Another caution about stooping to their level...watch your eyes. I often hand-feed grass and dandelion leaves to my birds. When I do this, I squat down. Every now and then one looks me in the eye and its head gets closer and closer. I have never let one strike me from head on, but I have had my glasses knocked off from curious turkeys off to the side.

    They are friendly, but like kids, don't think much about the consequences of their actions. Won't someone breed responsible turkeys? [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2010

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