Bird fostering question?

Annalyse

Songster
Mar 24, 2020
825
726
141
New Jersey
I'm looking into fostering birds and well was wondering, do Parrots remember their foster parents once adopted, and will they be upset?
 

Annalyse

Songster
Mar 24, 2020
825
726
141
New Jersey
Short answer, yes, they will remember you. Whether that upsets them or not depends on the interactions they had while being fostered.
Will it interfere with the new owners that adopted them? Most likely the "jobs" I will be doing during the foster is say they need to be more social with humans, I will have to get them used to that. But my plan is to have everyone in my house interact with the bird so it can get used to more people instead of one
 

Annalyse

Songster
Mar 24, 2020
825
726
141
New Jersey
As long as they go to a good home, I think fostering is a good idea.
thank you, yea since I'm not allowed to adopt because the money the fostering system I'm going to provides everything for me plus I get to help these birds and get them out of rescue and into a home.
 

ColtHandorf

Crowing
Feb 19, 2019
2,988
4,921
377
Klondike, Texas
Will it interfere with the new owners that adopted them? Most likely the "jobs" I will be doing during the foster is say they need to be more social with humans, I will have to get them used to that. But my plan is to have everyone in my house interact with the bird so it can get used to more people instead of one
No species is the same, and even within the species each individual can vary a bit. I'd do research into whatever species you are looking at fostering to determine their needs and the best way to provide an appropriate environment. Generally speaking, Amazons bond strongly with one person and aren't good "family" birds. African Greys do better in quiet, stimulating households and children may make them nervous. Cockatoos are essentially hormonal teddy bears. Quakers can get cage aggressive once they hit sexual maturity. Conures are loud and easily excited. Macaws can be a handful and due to their size make people nervous and they take advantage of that fear. Eclectus and Lories have special dietary needs. Indian Ringnecks go through a "bluffing" stage when young, and throughout their lives during breeding seasons. Expect that most fosters/rescues are going to come from homes where they were not in ideal living conditions and you'll have to deal with their individual needs as well as their species specific requirements.
 

Annalyse

Songster
Mar 24, 2020
825
726
141
New Jersey
No species is the same, and even within the species, each individual can vary a bit. I'd do research into whatever species you are looking at fostering to determine their needs and the best way to provide an appropriate environment. Generally speaking, Amazons bond strongly with one person and aren't good "family" birds. African Greys do better in quiet, stimulating households and children may make them nervous. Cockatoos are essentially hormonal teddy bears. Quakers can get cage aggressive once they hit sexual maturity. Conures are loud and easily excited. Macaws can be a handful and due to their size make people nervous and they take advantage of that fear. Eclectus and Lories have special dietary needs. Indian Ringnecks go through a "bluffing" stage when young, and throughout their lives during breeding seasons. Expect that most fosters/rescues are going to come from homes where they were not in ideal living conditions and you'll have to deal with their individual needs as well as their species-specific requirements.
oh yes, I know. I'm going to be fostering quaker-cocktail-sized parrots and under such as parakeets or maybe birds small than parakeets. I'm not fostering any with disabilities as I'm a beginner so just the ones that need to be more socialized with humans and or need trained good behavior. They will be with me so if I need or have a question I contact the system.
 

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