Blackhead pimples on comb and wattles!?!?!?!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ROEBUCKS, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. ROEBUCKS

    ROEBUCKS New Egg

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    Feb 19, 2009
    Tyler, Texas
    I have buff orpingtons hens about 6 months old that have what looks like blackhead pimples on their combs and wattles. What is this and do i need to do something? I have one roo and he has none of them on him.
     
  2. mypicklebird

    mypicklebird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 8, 2008
    Sonoma Co, CA
    Probably fowl or avian pox (virus spread my mosquitos mostly). Look for thread and photos of pox on BYC. Time heals the pox lesions. Some people put ointments or disinfectants on them, but 2-3 weeks is in general how long it takes for them to heal. Dry pox (comb, around the eyes, wattles, feet) is generally just a cosmetic problem, wet pox (lesions in the mouth and throat) can kill them. Severe dry pox can make it hard for them to see and eat- so watch for this- as you may need to help them.
     
  3. mypicklebird

    mypicklebird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 8, 2008
    Sonoma Co, CA
    Could also be injuries from the rooster grabbing their combs- can you post a photo?
     
  4. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2009
    DFW
    We're into our third week of fowl pox in our flock. What we noticed first were whitish areas on the combs and wattles, followed by black specks. The black specks then turned into fluid filled, yellowish pustules, which then dried up and turned into blackened, crusty, wart like areas.

    I have one chicken in the "warty" stage, two in the "yellow pustule" stage, one in the "black speck" stage, and one poor roo with wet pox. Other than looking ugly, the hens don't seem (so far) to be bothered by their dry pox. The roo got quickly ill with a secondary bacterial infection that has responded well to antibiotics. Other than sounding hoarse when he crows, he's acting his usual self now, although we are keeping him isolated from the rest of the flock.
     

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