blood in poop

StitchGirl

In the Brooder
Mar 31, 2015
24
0
22
the Netherlands
We got 4 speckled sussex hens and a rooster a week ago. They are 1 year old. They were kept in a large run at the sellers place and they were not vaccinated. At our place they free range. Anyways, yesterday morning I let them out i noticed there was one poop in their coop that had red in it. Today there was one again, so I thought to ask here is it normal.
I don't know which chicken it is and since they free range I am not aware if there are more bloody poops during the day. They are only here a week, so clearly I don't know yet what is "normal" behavior for them and if one of them is sick. They are still jumpy around us, but they come to me when I have worms for them. I did notice that yesterday and today they spend time just sitting under bushes after first foraging, again I don't know if that's normal. This is my first time having chickens and I don't know much so will appreciate any help.
I attached the picture of the today's poop.
 

StitchGirl

In the Brooder
Mar 31, 2015
24
0
22
the Netherlands
700
 

Akrnaf2

The educated Rhino
6 Years
Jul 5, 2014
16,822
15,042
732
Center of Israel
You need to treat against Coccidia That all you need to know to treat the situation. The infiormation is given by corteasy of Kathy (castportpony)

Due to some confusion on dose amounts regarding the powder, I decided to do some research and this is what I have so far. For those of you that use powder Corid, if you have been using 1/2 teaspoon per gallon (~270mg) you haven't been using enough.

The preventative dose (.006%) for Corid Powder is 1/3 teaspoon.
The preventative dose (.006%) for Corid liquid is 1/2 teaspoon.

The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid Powder is 3/4 teaspoon.
The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid liquid is 1 teaspoon.

The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid Powder is 1.5 teaspoons
The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid liquid is 2 teaspoon.

Corid mixing instructions for preventative (.006%) and moderate (.012%) outbreak dosing.
http://www.corid.com/SiteCollectionDocuments/CORID Slim Jim-All.pdf

Amprol 20% powder:
http://www.asp-inc.com/products/documents/prodinfo/a/amp128.pdf

Amprol 9.6% liquid:
http://www.asp-inc.com/products/documents/prodinfo/a/amp96.pdf

FDA recommendations:
http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/animaldrugsatfda/details.cfm?dn=013-149
"Chickens
Indications: For the treatment of coccidiosis.
Amount: Administer at the 0.012 percent level in drinking water as soon as coccidiosis is diagnosed and continue for 3 to 5 days (in severe outbreaks, give amprolium at the 0.024 percent level); continue with 0.006 percent amprolium-medicated water for an additional 1 to 2 weeks."

And this link has these instructions:
http://www.drugs.com/vet/amprol-9-6-solution-can.html
"Poultry - as Soon As Caecal Coccidiosis Is Diagnosed, Give 0.024% Amprolium In The Drinking Water For 5 To 7 Days. Continue The Treatment With 0.006% Amprolium Medicated Water For An Additional One To Two Weeks. No Other Source Of Drinking Water Should Be Available To The Birds During This Time."

Here's the math, let me know if I made an error.

There are 200mg of amprolium in every 1 gram of powder.
1 ounce = 3.5 tablespoons = 28.35 grams
200mg x 28.35 = 5670mg in 3.5 tablespoons of powder.
There are 10.5 teaspoons in 3.5 tablespoons
There are 21 1/2 teaspoons in 10.5 teaspoons
5670mg divided by 21 1/2 teaspoons = ~270mg per 1/2 teaspoon
There are two 1/4 teaspoons per 1/2 teaspoon
270 mg divided by 2 = 135mg per 1/4 teaspoon


Amount of Amprolium (Corid or Amprol) powder per 1/4 teaspoon

One 1/4 teaspoon = 135 mg
1/2 teaspoon = 270 mg
3/4 teaspoon =405 mg
1 teaspoon = 540 mg
1 & 1/4 teaspoons = 675 mg
1 & 1/2 teaspoons = 810 mg
1 & 3/4 teaspoons = 945 mg
2 teaspoons= 1080 mg


Amount of Amprolium (Corid or Amprol) liquid per 1/4 teaspoon

One 1/4 teaspoon = 120 mg
1/2 teaspoon = 240 mg
3/4 teaspoons = 360 mg
1 teaspoon = 480 mg
1 & 1/4 teaspoons = 600 mg
1 & 1/2 teaspoons = 720 mg
1 & 3/4 teaspoons = 840
2 teaspoons = 960 mg

There are 4.92892ml/teaspoon, but the numbers above were calculated using 5ml/teaspoon

Here is what's in 1-10ml of the liquid
1ml = 96mg
2ml = 192mg
3ml = 288mg
4ml = 384mg
5ml = 480mg
6ml = 576mg
7ml = 672mg
8ml = 768mg
9ml = 864mg
10ml = 960mg

Bottom line, 1 teaspoon (540mg) of powder is equal to 5.625ml of liquid and 1/2 teaspoon powder (270mg) is equal to 2.8125ml liquid.

1/2 teaspoon of 20% powder = 2.8125ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 270mg of amprolium.
3/4 teaspoon of 20% powder = 4.21875ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 405mg of amprolium.
1 teaspoon of 20% powder = 5.625ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 540mg of amprolium.
1.5 teaspoons of 20% powder =8.4375ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 810mg of amprolium.
1.75 teaspoons of 20% powder = 9.84375ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 945mg of amprolium.
2 teaspoons of 20% powder = 11.25ml of 9.6% liquid - Both have 1080mg of amprolium.



And if that doesn't convince people, here is another way I did it:

From:
http://www.asp-inc.com/products/documents/prodinfo/a/amp128.pdf:

Dosage Level Mixing Directions
0.024% Dissolve 8 ounces of AMPROL 128 20% Soluble Powder in about five gallons of water in a 50-gallon medication barrel. Stir, then add water to the 50 gallon mark. Stir thoroughly.
0.012% Follow same directions as above but use 4 ounces of AMPROL 128 20% Soluble Powder.
0.006% Follow same directions as above but use 2 ounces of AMPROL 128 20% Soluble Powder.

Facts
One pack = 10 oz. (283.5 grams)
One ounce = 28.35 grams
One ounce of powder = ~3.5 tablespoons
200mg amprolium per 1 gram

My twisted math for the .024% level
If 8 ounces (28.35g x 8 = 226.8 grams) are needed for 50 gallons, then 1/50 of that is needed for 1 gallon, right? So that would be 226.8 grams divided by 50 = 4.536 grams per gallon. (doing this as I type, so correct me if I'm wrong, please!)

So how much does a teaspoon of Corid or Amprol powder weigh? Anyone know? Well, time to break out my gram scale and do some weighing... also have a call into the mfg of Corid and I'm expecting a call back from them.

Just got a call back from them and it is 4.536 grams per gallon. He also said that it's a very safe product and the risk of overdosing is very slim.

-Kathy


Disclaimer:
In the past I have treated my chicken chicks with 2 teaspoons of the liquid for 5-7 days, that's it, but I *might* try the .006% follow up the next time I have to treat chicks.



Edited by casportpony - 10/2/13 at 7:14am



Various Necropsies - Contains Very Graphic Pictures!
 
Last edited:

StitchGirl

In the Brooder
Mar 31, 2015
24
0
22
the Netherlands
Thanks. We called the vet just after I posted this and he thought the same. I got some powder that they will drink for the next 5 days. I also ordered Braggs to give them in their water afterwards.
Its just that the vet didn't perform any tests, didn't even see the poop or the chickens so how can hè be sure thats what they've got? I am all for medicine when it is needed, but what if they got something else or perhaps nothing at all? They must have suffered big stress à week ago when we brought them home and introduced them to free ranging. Could it be they just ate something wrong?
 

Eggcessive

Addict
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Apr 3, 2011
58,839
50,341
1,302
southern Ohio
Chickens can get new strains of coccidia when they move to a new home and soil, since there are at least 9 or more strains. They usually build up a tolerance to coccidia in their home environment by the age of 4 months, but they can get it anytime, especislly if there is a new strain or a lack of immunity. Another common cause of blood in the stools is enteritis, and capillaria worms. If you continue to notice bloody droppings after treatment is finished, then I would recommend to either get a collective droppings sample tested for worms, bacteria, and coccidia by your vet in a fecal float test, or treat with SafeGuard liquid Goat Wormer (a brand of fenbendazole) 1/4 ml per pound of weight for 5 straight day, given orally to each chicken. After you treat for coccidia with Corid, don't use ACV in the water since it can be irritating to their injured intestines, but instead give them some probiotics and vitamins for a few days to replace what they have lost in the gut.
 

Akrnaf2

The educated Rhino
6 Years
Jul 5, 2014
16,822
15,042
732
Center of Israel
Chickens can get new strains of coccidia when they move to a new home and soil, since there are at least 9 or more strains. They usually build up a tolerance to coccidia in their home environment by the age of 4 months, but they can get it anytime, especislly if there is a new strain or a lack of immunity. Another common cause of blood in the stools is enteritis, and capillaria worms. If you continue to notice bloody droppings after treatment is finished, then I would recommend to either get a collective droppings sample tested for worms, bacteria, and coccidia by your vet in a fecal float test, or treat with SafeGuard liquid Goat Wormer (a brand of fenbendazole) 1/4 ml per pound of weight for 5 straight day, given orally to each chicken. After you treat for coccidia with Corid, don't use ACV in the water since it can be irritating to their injured intestines, but instead give them some probiotics and vitamins for a few days to replace what they have lost in the gut.

X2
I would like to give you some tips that should help you to prevent pathogen establishment in your flock in the long run.
0. Buy the most fresh,good, and balanced feed that you can find.
1. If you can ferment your feed (lactic fermentation only!) it will be wonderful for your floc. lactic fermentation of chicken feed gives your chicken A constant supply of probiotics and much needed vitamins that keep your chicken healthy.
2. Use ACV or Garlic in in the drinking water.
3. Ad the most hottest chili flakes you can find to the feed (2 tablespoon for 1 kg) the Capsaicin in the chili is a good preventer.
4. Give your chickens a good constant provision of clean an fresh water daily.
5. Supply to your chickens vegetables and fruit every day.
6. Keep down the stress levels in your flock.
7. Keep clean an ventilated coop.
8. Be strict white the bio security of your flock.
Good luck
 
Last edited:

StitchGirl

In the Brooder
Mar 31, 2015
24
0
22
the Netherlands
I just let them out and have not seen any bloody poop in the coop! However there was one frothy poop and one diarheal poop. Maybe reaction to medicated water? The whole coop was quite smelly with it.
Thanks for answering eggcesive and akrnaf2. I will keep a look for reocurrence of bloody poop and I will hold the vinegar until a week after they stop medicine?
They are already getting organic feed for layers, extra oyster shells and fresh water every day. They are out in the garden whole day foraging and sleeping under the bushes. Should I give them fresh veg/fruit every day as well? I gave them apple and pear and the pumpkin so far. (This is like having babies again!-poop and food talk)I also got feed without pellets(just grains) and I will start fermenting it today.

Should I be worried about strange poops today?
 

dawg53

Humble
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Nov 27, 2008
27,599
13,585
886
Glen St Mary, Florida
Stop feeding them vegetables and fruits and feed them layer feed only. Provide them freshwater with nothing added to it except the initial amprolium/corid treatment. Their feces will clear up back to normal. There is no withdrawal period after using amprolium/corid. Keep it simple.
 
Last edited:

Akrnaf2

The educated Rhino
6 Years
Jul 5, 2014
16,822
15,042
732
Center of Israel
Don't stop giving them fruits, vegetables and herbs! And do ferment the feed you are giving them,or give them probiotics from outer sources.
To back up my claims I would ask you to write this question:"what plants can use for coccidia treatment?" In Google scholar, and there you will find dozens of academic articles about many plants that have materials that can treat and infect the coccidia parasite especially Garlic(vegetable) Banana (fruit) and Wormwood-Artemisia (herb)!
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom