Blue egg questions

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by TurtleFeathers, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. TurtleFeathers

    TurtleFeathers Fear the Turtle!

    841
    14
    151
    Jan 9, 2009
    By the Chesapeake Bay
    Hi all -

    At the risk sounding really dumb, I need to ask a couple questions - I'm a bit confused, so let me see if I can get this right:

    1. If a hen hatches from a blue egg, does that mean she will produce blue eggs? Regardless of whether or not the roo she breeds with carries the blue gene? If the roo is a brown egg breed, will her eggs be green?

    2. If a rooster hatches from a blue egg, does that mean any of his offspring will carry the blue egg gene? Regardless of whether or not the mother of his offspring is a blue egg gene carrier?

    The reason I ask is, I have 4 EE hens living with my silkies - the EE's, of course, lay blue eggs, and the silkies, brown. I'm just wondering what color eggs the NEXT generation from these EE hens will produce - blue, green or brown?

    Thanks so much -

    Kathy
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude

    Quote:
     
  3. onthespot

    onthespot Deluxe Dozens

    7,187
    36
    271
    Mar 29, 2008
    Riverside/Norco, CA
    It is not that simple. They have to inherit the blue egg gene from at least one parent to lay a blue egg. Most of the olive/easter eggers and ameraucanas, that gene is closely associated with the pea comb. If a chick hatches out from either parent from that sort of breed that has a pea comb, and the chick inherits the pea comb, there is around a 97% chance it will produce a blue egg, or carry the gene. The rooster can hatch out of a tan egg, but if it's father had a pea comb and it has a pea comb, it can still pass on the blue egg gene "probably" and same for the hen. If the baby hatches out of the brightest blue egg in the world and has a single comb, it has only a 3% chance of carrying the blue egg gene... Hope that helps.

    There are pea combed breeds which do not carry the blue egg gene, brahmas for example. There are varieties that lay blue eggs and do not have pea combs... go figure.
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude

    Well, genetics are never all that simple, LOL. Sometimes, you get thrown for a loop. There is your basic answer and then there are all the possible exceptions to the rules.
    I have a nice pea combed Ameraucana girl who lays a green egg and I have a non-pea combed girl who lays a green egg and a girl who is not pure for pea comb who lays a blue egg. So many variables, depending on how genes combine.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: