Bone Broth (For collagen extraction). Possible issue?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by sen2two, Jun 17, 2019.

  1. sen2two

    sen2two In the Brooder

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    I fit two 2lb-ish birds into a Crock-pot and set to high for 6 hours. I then removed the meat from the bones, which just more or less fell off, then put all the bones back in until it was a total of 24 hours. I put a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar at the start. 1 onion and some pre minced garlic from a jar. Also, some salt but that’s it.

    One problem is though, the reason it stopped exactly at 24 hours was coincidence. The power went out for 6 hours. To try and save the bone broth, I did not lift the Crock-pot lid and I put it into the oven to help protect it. When the power came back on, I immediately dumped what was in the Crock-pot through a strainer (one meant for spaghetti, so not the greatest) into a Tupperware and then directly into the fridge.


    So, is what I have even considered bone broth? Is there a decent amount of collagen in there? Did it potentially spoil and needs to be thrown away?
     
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  2. IamRainey

    IamRainey Songster

    I'm sure it's OK but you can make sure by bring it to a boil and then simmering some more to kill any small amount of bacteria that might have gotten an opportunity to get started. Then refrigerate or freeze it again for storage.

    If it gels in the fridge (bet it DOES!), you've got bone broth. And I'm sure it's yummy as well. I add additional meat that hasn't been boiled to death and fresh veggies to turn it into soup.

    I use my slow cooker for stocks and broths too. And I go 48 hours -- which may mean resetting the countdown timer. I get a turkey stock after Thanksgiving that wants to gel at room temp. Sooo rich and delicious! Good for you too!
     
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  3. sen2two

    sen2two In the Brooder

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    So, after I got home from work I checked out my tub of "Bone Broth." To my delight it was completely congealed! I broke out some old no longer used baby food containers we used top meal prep for my daughter. They fit a 1/2 cup each very nicely. I got 4 1/2 cups in total. Now frozen for future use.

    I then for the first time, consumed some of the meat I raised and butchered along with some of the bone broth.

    8oz chicken shredded up, 1/2 cup bone broth. And some turmeric/curcumin. Little added Pink Himalayan salt, Cumin and Garlic as well. Then 6 hard boiled eggs to finish me off.

    Never felt better after finishing my meal. :)
     
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  4. IamRainey

    IamRainey Songster

    I like 18oz., straight-sided, wide-mouth canning jars. I get 4-6 of them from a 6qt slow cooker.

    The advantage of the tall jars is that the fat accumulates on the top of the jar and there are fewer of them to de-fat once they've cooled. The straight sides also make de-fatting easier. I probably de-fat once for 3-4 mugs of broth warmed and served. Also, individual jars cool faster and the fat solidifies faster. Not as fast as baby food jars, to be sure! But faster than the 4 or 5 quarts I used to cool in the slow cooker liner I used to put in the fridge. A pint jar is also about the right amount to turn into a family-size serving of soup.
     
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  5. Parront

    Parront Crowing

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    Lots of people who like the broth simmer it on the stove for days. I like my pressure cookers, even more since I moved to a high altitude. If you have a pressure cooker, you can be sure that you have killed all bacteria. Cooked at 15 lbs pressure, it is 250 degrees. (Boiling temp varies depending on the altitude, so here in Prescott, I use my pressure cooker more than I ever have)! If you cook anything at 250 degrees for 20 minutes or more, the germs are DEAD! The Pressure Canning time is about 70 minutes if you have pint jars in a canner, but for broth to freeze, if you have a question about the fitness, bringing it to 15 lbs pressure for 20 minutes removes all doubt from my mind -- either to eat myself or feed my grand kids.
     
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  6. sen2two

    sen2two In the Brooder

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    I am wondering why just about every "How-to"on making bone broth I have read mentioned removing the fat. Is it necessary? I prefer to leave it in. I predominantly eat a lower carb higher fat diet. I also like the flavor that fat adds.

    Are their downfalls to not removing the fat?
     
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  7. Mosey2003

    Mosey2003 Crowing

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    There are a couple reasons, I'd venture:
    1. America has been very anti-fat since the late 80's, early 90's
    2. A grease slick on top of your soup is a bit unappetizing.

    Some people also really like to cook with schmaltz (chicken fat) so it would be removed to be stored for that purpose (in the fridge).

    I'm HFLC too, when I'm behaving :)
     
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  8. Parront

    Parront Crowing

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    Some older birds and even younger Cornish-X have a lot of fat, so I remove some especially if I have put it in the refrigerator over night. Your noodles can come out too "greasy" for some tastes. There is always a use around my place for the extra fat. I like to fry potatoes in it -- YUM!
     
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  9. RUNuts

    RUNuts Free Ranging

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    I like the greasy soup. Of course, I'm dipping home made bread in it most of the time too. Doing pretty good. Low carb and only one loaf of bread a month or so. The holidays when the kids come home is when we bake the most.

    I freeze the broth or store it in the frig for a week with the fat on top. The fat will seal the broth. Wonderful stuff.

    The chicken fat is great for oven roasted vegetables in addition to the potatoes. Sweet taters, zucchini, bell pepper, cauliflower and all that goodness.
     
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  10. miken56

    miken56 Chirping

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    My thoughts on fat be it chicken(smaltz), duck, pork(lard), or cow(butter) are all natural, not processed, homogenized, hydrogenated, etc. I feel when they are altered to make them more appealing, longer lasting on store shelves is where problems start.
     
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