Breeding Cornish X Rocks

KatyTheChickenLady

Bird of A Different Feather
11 Years
Dec 20, 2008
5,146
25
251
Boise, Idaho
Quote:
Genetically modified? They are have practiced highly selective breeding, but not genetic modification in the same way as has happened in grains. But, I'm sure that is eventually coming...

thank you.
 

phasianidae

Songster
10 Years
Nov 9, 2010
1,952
69
236

Country Parson

Songster
9 Years
Oct 1, 2010
301
14
111
Bellefontaine, OH
I realize they (scientists) have genetically modified chickens, but to my knowledge such chickens are not currently being used in USA meat production at this time.

Let me know if I'm wrong.
 

KatyTheChickenLady

Bird of A Different Feather
11 Years
Dec 20, 2008
5,146
25
251
Boise, Idaho
You missed this line "These particular birds are only intended for research purposes, not for consumption." in your first article
and this line "Intriguing as the new approach is, the problem is far from solved. Years more testing will be needed to make sure there's no hidden hazard from this type of genetic modification. And then there's the public relations work that will be needed to persuade government agencies and consumers to accept the GM chickens" in your second article.

Not to mention neither has anything to do with genteticly modifying meat birds for rapid growth, or for the consumer trade.

As was said before CX are selectively bred, they are not geneticly modified.
 

SamG347

Songster
12 Years
Mar 4, 2007
2,372
30
211
PA
There are no "Genetically Modified" birds being used in the U.S. or the world markets as far as I know. Being that I'm in touch with a lot of poultry techs and professors that travel all across the country and are deal with a lot of the commercial producers makes me believe that I'm correct in saying that. The birds grow to a large size and fast solely due to GOOD GENETIC BREEDING...there are also no HORMONES being used in poultry for better meat or egg production...as these don't exist.

cool.png
 

bluere11e

Songster
8 Years
Feb 8, 2011
322
10
113
West Palm Beach
This is great information. I've often wondered, How they can be breeding these for over 50 years and have the consistancy, yet they do not produce true.
I was thinking about holding some back, but, I do see that there is an age limit bred into the bird. It may only lay one cycle before it quits and then, it
will have to go into the soup pot.. Barred Rocks always seemed to be the best dual purpose birds, However, I don't like black ink dots on my meat where the feathers were
(I know, I know.. I'm still weird about that though). Has anyone crossed barred roos with white cornish hens or vise versa?
 

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