BREEDING FOR PRODUCTION...EGGS AND OR MEAT.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by hellbender, Dec 27, 2013.

  1. Heron's Nest Farm

    Heron's Nest Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I buy straight run from hatcheries for one reason. They kill unwanted cocks in inhumane ways. I prefer taking this responsibility on myself. Simply my ethics.

    I agree with what has been said about hatchery chicks. I have had success with them, and I will isolate the best of my 50 that come in Feb for layer stock, but I must say that buying from local breeders has been a real treat. The birds are amazing in comparison with their quality. I have blood lines from known breeders and I can really work genetics this way.

    That being said, I believe you can have success with hatchery birds if you are highly selective. I think you will be starting further back in your genetics than with a local breeder, but maybe this will really give you some street smarts when it comes to breeding.

    I also agree about not getting spread too thin. It takes real focus to create something refined.

    I breed for eggs and I breed separately for the SOP in my Orpingtons.

    Best of luck folks! I look forward to everyones' unfolding adventure!

    Just put in 50 fruit trees on the farm, got new poultry fencing, a solar fence charger for rotating pasture, got the makings of a new mobil coop to build, ordered my production hens and pedigree hatching eggs, ordered our seeds, hired someone to build us a new website for the farm (YAY!) and now I'm off to Guatemala for 12 days to get recharged before we spring into action in the greenhouse and on the farm...whew. I look forward to catching up upon return!
     
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  2. Heron's Nest Farm

    Heron's Nest Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    579
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    Dec 11, 2011
    Oregon
    I clean everything out and like to let everything dry. I then spray anything wood with neem oil. Once that has sat a day I lime the whole place down. If you have a wood floor I recommend creating a water and ag lime solution and flooding your floor with it so it soaks in. Again let dry before adding litter and returning the hens.

    Maybe it's overkill but I think this makes sense. I have a breeding area that I will clean out and keep vacant for 3-5 months to allow the death of disease and pathogens. Of course I have the room with multiple chicken areas.[​IMG] Not everyone does!
     
  3. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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  4. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    Grinder's Switch
    To be forthright, to your query or request for me to expound on my statement would be difficult at this point as it requires several complex mathematical equations and explanation thereof and I'm not mentally or physically prepared to take a swing at it at this moment. I'm tired, sleepy and in fairly severe pain but I promise to take a swing at it very soon.

    I am far from a math phenom so I will have to depend on work of others to put this in order.

    (How do I get myself into sheit like this)....But my basic premise IS Correct!!! [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I do have the presence of mind to say without reservation that the process is terminal at the F-1 generation, unless I were to bring in another related breed to breed to the F-1 offspring. That too would be using one particular gender over the other; the F-1 bird would be a hen covered by a cock of the other breed...Out for tonight!!! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2015
  5. RedRidge

    RedRidge Chillin' With My Peeps

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    TN
    We use only dirt floors for a variety of reasons. The trick is putting them on high ground so drainage is away from pen. No moisture = little to no problems
     
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  6. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    Grinder's Switch
    That's exactly what we did with the new building last summer.
     
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  7. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    I do to. Placed smartly, and the interior grade built up, I find this option superior. We have very sandy soil as in six feet deep sandy soil, and that helps. I very small trench on three sides, draining to the low side helps to keep the interior dry as well.

    I use deep bedding on dirt (sand) in the permanent structures. I do not like wood floors. Other than ease of cleaning, if there was a red mite infestation to get established, they would be much harder to treat. Also when they are too low to the ground, it becomes a hide out for rodents.

    I also like the structure to be exposed on the interior and painted with a good grade of paint. The interior being painted white.
     
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  8. hellbender

    hellbender Overrun With Chickens

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    Grinder's Switch
    As mentioned before our first buildings that have been used for decades are converted cow milk parlors with concrete floors. No one in their right mind could consider trying to chop out 8 inch concrete floors..lolol So concrete they will stay.

    We finally eliminated our laying flock so for the most part, these buildings will likely be used only for storage and/or some over-flow with our 'projects' in the new building but I don't imagine ever getting back to the numbers we used to carry.
     
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  9. gjensen

    gjensen Overrun With Chickens

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    Feb 22, 2011
    Midlands, South Carolina
    There are many advantages to a concrete floor. There is no perfect, only preferences. All have hang ups and advantages.

    If I had buildings with concrete floors, my birds would be on concrete floors.

    It isn't to say that that wood is not an option. Personally, I got away from them over time.
     
  10. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 19, 2011
    Massachusetts, USA
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2015

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