Brooder supplies

Shezadandy

Crowing
Sep 26, 2015
2,173
2,712
357
Portland OR
So you put paper towels over the pellets? for the first week or two?
I do the paper towels over everything for the first 5-7 days, yes, with pellets underneath to keep things as dry as possible and keep the poop from gluing the paper towel to the bottom of the box.

I keep their initial space, that first brooder, limited in size, i.e. like a medium Uhaul box (for up to 6) for those first days. Then they feel like they've REALLY got it made when they move to the bigger box!!

After the move to the bigger area, I just use the paper towels under where they sleep to keep cleaning nice and easy, and to keep an eye on the poop - probably for 2-3 weeks - and then just pine pellets after that.

Elevating the water container after that first week becomes important because they'll start kicking stuff around. Whether it's a scrap of 2x4 (no pressure treated wood in the brooder!) or something else- helps keep the water cleaner.
 

Alex S

Chirping
Nov 20, 2020
248
295
83
Kirkland, Washington
Ah. Sorry. The long sleeve t-shirt.

Inevitably it seems there's always someone who gets pasty butt. The first time I was faced with pasty butt and a faucet ... it got really messy.

One chick did me the favor of teaching me the easiest way to clean pasty butt (or whatever else). For comfort, chicks go to their momma hens, tuck their heads on in there and that's the safest place in the world. The chick decided my long sleeve shirt was a terrific warm safe place to hide.

So I developed my method of handling chicks for butt cleaning in the most stress free (and least amount of water all over the place) way possible. They are tiny and of course delicate, but they can move and when upset they can rival a smoke alarm for sharp loud noise. They need to be secured so you don't end up with a soaking wet baby - and make sure they don't land in the sink risking injury, or worse, do a chick ninja move and end up on the floor.

Anyways - I pick them up--- making sure it's a NICE WARM AND DRY hand - much like you would pick up a computer mouse- from above. Non-dominant hand- so if you're right handed, pick up and hold with the LEFT hand Their head faces your long sleeve (wrist), their back is up against the palm of your hand to keep them warm, and the feet then just kinda dangle, but their entire body is supported by your fingers. The long sleeve should come to about the base of your fingers to give the chick somewhere to hide.

If they haven't already done it, tuck their head into the long sleeve shirt. The vent should be accessible between your index and middle fingers. It also makes it easier to see what you're doing. Then with warm water directly from the tap, run the water (obviously on low volume) over the vent until the poop is cleared, using the free hand to gently clean.

Then of course you've got a handtowel or washcloth waiting to set the chick on- and a few squares of Charmin toilet paper to wrap the chick in to wick away the moisture.

The blow dryer (having been set to the lowest heat and air volume, and warmed up before directing at the chick butt) then gets used to get chickie back to being its fully fluffed up self again. Putting a chick back un-fluffed can create a problem for that chick.

Chick(en)s' vents are ALWAYS moving. This becomes a source of intrigue to the others, because it looks like a worm they should peck and explore. When fluffy - the vent is somewhat disguised. When technically dry but not blow-dried, the vent is on full display.

So how to blow dry a chick:
I do it much the same way as I wash them after they've received their Charmin bath robe drying off treatment. With the washcloth/hand towel under their feet, I cup my hand over them, allow them to hide their heads under the sleeve (they pick this up pretty quick) - and then it's pretty easy.




I wish we had a TSC but ... not yet. At least Wilco finally put a store on the way to somewhere I go regularly - all other farm store locations are far enough that I really have to want to go from my house.
Very good to know!
 

Shezadandy

Crowing
Sep 26, 2015
2,173
2,712
357
Portland OR
Roughly 1'8 wide 2'6 long
I would use that as the first brooder box for that first few days period of time. They'll go from wattling little peeps to fast little monsters- that's about the time to move them to the next size.

Then move them to their luxury 4x4 Uhaul suite. =)
 

Alex S

Chirping
Nov 20, 2020
248
295
83
Kirkland, Washington
I do the paper towels over everything for the first 5-7 days, yes, with pellets underneath to keep things as dry as possible and keep the poop from gluing the paper towel to the bottom of the box.

I keep their initial space, that first brooder, limited in size, i.e. like a medium Uhaul box (for up to 6) for those first days. Then they feel like they've REALLY got it made when they move to the bigger box!!

After the move to the bigger area, I just use the paper towels under where they sleep to keep cleaning nice and easy, and to keep an eye on the poop - probably for 2-3 weeks - and then just pine pellets after that.

Elevating the water container after that first week becomes important because they'll start kicking stuff around. Whether it's a scrap of 2x4 (no pressure treated wood in the brooder!) or something else- helps keep the water cleaner.
Two things...

Can you send a link to what size Uhaul box you got?

Next, do you think these plans are worth my money? Here's the link
 

Shezadandy

Crowing
Sep 26, 2015
2,173
2,712
357
Portland OR
Two things...

Can you send a link to what size Uhaul box you got?

Next, do you think these plans are worth my money? Here's the link
Box, for just the first few days, works as a spot:

U-Haul: Medium Moving Box


Personally I wouldn't bother with a book of chicken coop plans. This website has a huge array of them - for free!

I will point you this way - I built mine based on an actual shed (linked below for your 6x8 size), because I too wanted a walk-in shed - and I added windows ("hopper" windows) and other ventilation features in as I built it. I made the floor frame stronger by adding the extra boards. I used the thicker 23/32" plywood for the floor board, and I added horse stall mats as my flooring material to make sure mud and chicken poop wouldn't rot the floor and for easy cleaning, given our climate. They come in 4x6ft size, so you'd need 2 of them.

Once you've built a shed ... adjusting it to be a coop isn't all that hard, as long as you add enough windows and other ventilation ... and a chicken door, I recommend an automatic door for predator protection.

Making roost tables and nest boxes is easy enough using leftover materials. My nest boxes are on the inside, because with all the rain and wind we get, adding something that sticks out over the side of the roof sounded like more trouble than it was worth, but many people have figured out how to make that work.

Also ... then it can always be used as a garden shed or storage shed later, if you move.

Handy Home Products Garden Shed 6 ft. x 8 ft. Wood Storage Shed with Galvanized Metal Roof-19371-2 - The Home Depot

These are the free, step by step, construction guide for this 6x8ft shed. Including all the dimensions on all the pieces. =) So you can follow the directions without needing to buy the kit. The directions are in the "Info/Assembly" link in the "Info and Guides" box.

e1c75247-cefa-42e8-8555-a763223c1233.pdf (homedepot-static.com)
 

Alex S

Chirping
Nov 20, 2020
248
295
83
Kirkland, Washington
Box, for just the first few days, works as a spot:

U-Haul: Medium Moving Box


Personally I wouldn't bother with a book of chicken coop plans. This website has a huge array of them - for free!

I will point you this way - I built mine based on an actual shed (linked below for your 6x8 size), because I too wanted a walk-in shed - and I added windows ("hopper" windows) and other ventilation features in as I built it. I made the floor frame stronger by adding the extra boards. I used the thicker 23/32" plywood for the floor board, and I added horse stall mats as my flooring material to make sure mud and chicken poop wouldn't rot the floor and for easy cleaning, given our climate. They come in 4x6ft size, so you'd need 2 of them.

Once you've built a shed ... adjusting it to be a coop isn't all that hard, as long as you add enough windows and other ventilation ... and a chicken door, I recommend an automatic door for predator protection.

Making roost tables and nest boxes is easy enough using leftover materials. My nest boxes are on the inside, because with all the rain and wind we get, adding something that sticks out over the side of the roof sounded like more trouble than it was worth, but many people have figured out how to make that work.

Also ... then it can always be used as a garden shed or storage shed later, if you move.

Handy Home Products Garden Shed 6 ft. x 8 ft. Wood Storage Shed with Galvanized Metal Roof-19371-2 - The Home Depot

These are the free, step by step, construction guide for this 6x8ft shed. Including all the dimensions on all the pieces. =) So you can follow the directions without needing to buy the kit. The directions are in the "Info/Assembly" link in the "Info and Guides" box.

e1c75247-cefa-42e8-8555-a763223c1233.pdf (homedepot-static.com)
Well my family is fine with the garden shed... but the dog kennel run to them is "ugly" and "perment" So that's why I was looking into coop books.
 

Alex S

Chirping
Nov 20, 2020
248
295
83
Kirkland, Washington
Box, for just the first few days, works as a spot:

U-Haul: Medium Moving Box


Personally I wouldn't bother with a book of chicken coop plans. This website has a huge array of them - for free!

I will point you this way - I built mine based on an actual shed (linked below for your 6x8 size), because I too wanted a walk-in shed - and I added windows ("hopper" windows) and other ventilation features in as I built it. I made the floor frame stronger by adding the extra boards. I used the thicker 23/32" plywood for the floor board, and I added horse stall mats as my flooring material to make sure mud and chicken poop wouldn't rot the floor and for easy cleaning, given our climate. They come in 4x6ft size, so you'd need 2 of them.

Once you've built a shed ... adjusting it to be a coop isn't all that hard, as long as you add enough windows and other ventilation ... and a chicken door, I recommend an automatic door for predator protection.

Making roost tables and nest boxes is easy enough using leftover materials. My nest boxes are on the inside, because with all the rain and wind we get, adding something that sticks out over the side of the roof sounded like more trouble than it was worth, but many people have figured out how to make that work.

Also ... then it can always be used as a garden shed or storage shed later, if you move.

Handy Home Products Garden Shed 6 ft. x 8 ft. Wood Storage Shed with Galvanized Metal Roof-19371-2 - The Home Depot

These are the free, step by step, construction guide for this 6x8ft shed. Including all the dimensions on all the pieces. =) So you can follow the directions without needing to buy the kit. The directions are in the "Info/Assembly" link in the "Info and Guides" box.

e1c75247-cefa-42e8-8555-a763223c1233.pdf (homedepot-static.com)
If I got the Extra Large Uhaul box... How long would that work for?
 

Shezadandy

Crowing
Sep 26, 2015
2,173
2,712
357
Portland OR
Well my family is fine with the garden shed... but the dog kennel run to them is "ugly" and "perment" So that's why I was looking into coop books.
Hey so ... just net the entire backyard (and carefully examine the fence) ... voila!!! no ugly dog kennel run. =)
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom