Broody Pen Design?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Branumdragon, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. Branumdragon

    Branumdragon Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 6, 2013
    Alpha Centauri
    We have a broody Silkie. She has resisted all efforts on our part to make her snap out of it, and our neighbor just lost two chickens to a fox. We wanted to stick two day-old chicks under her, because it was my understanding that if you put a chick under a broody hen while she's asleep, she will adopt it. One problem: I read that you need to separate a hen with chicks from other birds, because they will take any opportunity to kill the chicks. Do we need a new pen to keep her in? She's entirely accepted by the rest of the flock. The coop is the only way we have to keep a chicken separated from the others, and the wired- in part is too small for any chicken to spend any amount of time shut in. We want to build a separate pen, in the corner of the yard, to keep her in for a few weeks. It would need to be at least large enough for two chickens, but not large enough that it dominates the yard. I think one would just be good to have, because you could use it for quarantine, a hospital, or any number of things. Does anyone have a suggestion for a run/pen thing?
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2013
  2. Kjordanov

    Kjordanov Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 19, 2012
    NW
    Well for something that could be temporary that you can easily put away and take out again, get a plastic dog house and then stake some chicken wire around to make a pen. You could also use a dog exercise pen. Just an idea.
     
  3. Branumdragon

    Branumdragon Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 6, 2013
    Alpha Centauri
    WE HAVE EGGS! Picked up six bantams earlier. Planning to stick them under her tonight Hoping for the best. [​IMG]
     
  4. Kjordanov

    Kjordanov Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 19, 2012
    NW
    Cool!
     
  5. Mama Hen Chris

    Mama Hen Chris Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Peoria, AZ
    This is what we did. Hubby had made a "patio cover" at the end of the run for the girls to hang out under so I had unused space above the cover. Hubby made a little dog house type coop. I have used this for my broodies and their chicks. I use it for my grow out pen when chicks outgrow my brooder in the house. Right now it is empty and sometimes my hens decide to lay eggs in there instead of their nest boxes.

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  6. Branumdragon

    Branumdragon Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 6, 2013
    Alpha Centauri
    She's sitting! She managed to not cover four eggs, and they froze. We live in Northern Colorado. It snowed. Two eggs are still there, though, so I need to get the pen built pretty fast. Oh, and thanks for your suggestions! Great photos!
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2013
  7. Branumdragon

    Branumdragon Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 6, 2013
    Alpha Centauri
    Would something like this work?
    [​IMG]
    Would it need a nest inside? I don't know if they lay while they have chicks...
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2013
  8. 4Hgirl

    4Hgirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 28, 2013
    Brevard County, FL
    I would just use a large dog crate for a quick fix. We resort to the crates often for sick or hurt birds.
     
  9. Branumdragon

    Branumdragon Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 6, 2013
    Alpha Centauri
    Haven't posted in while... Lost one egg over Spring Break, but other due to hatch Wednesday... I hope. She'll probably stay broody forever if it doesn't.
     
  10. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    South Georgia
    I separate a broody while she is sitting on eggs, but once the chicks are a day or two old and she has them out eating and drinking. I allow them all in with the rest of the flock. She should protect the chicks from the others. This way, when she quits mothering aorund 4-6 weeks, the chicks are already an accepted part of the flock. I've done this several times without a problem. Another hen will get curious or start to move toward the chicks at first, and the mama runs the other hen off. Pretty soon the others leave her alone. If you have a roo, he mght even help raise the chicks.
     

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