Brown leghorn rooster developing slow?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by texas hiker, Nov 12, 2014.

  1. texas hiker

    texas hiker Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 22, 2009
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    My wife and I traded for a couple of young roosters. One is a buff and the other I think is a brown leghorn. They were only around 2 months old when we got them.

    Fast forward 3 months:

    The buff orpington rooster has been crowing for a couple of weeks and has started asking like a rooster. He gets upset when the hens sound like they are distressed. I can pick up a hen, she goes to swaking, and the buff rooster comes running.

    The brown leghorn on the other hand, is not crowing, not acting like a rooster in anyway,,,, nothing.

    The buff is in with a young flock of hens that are only 4 months old.

    The leghorn is in with a flock of older hens that are 1 - 2 years old.

    My wife and I have two separate chicken yards.

    The brown leghorn is just as big as the full grown hens, his tail feathers are starting to come in, just he is not crowing or acting like a rooster.

    The flock where the leghorn is at gets laying pellets and hen scratch mixed together.

    The flock with the buff, because they are younger are getting chick grower.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2014
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    My guess is that the Leghorn rooster is intimidated by the older hens. This will make him less likely to crow and act like a rooster. Also, at least going from the dates that you posted, he is only about five months old. Many roosters aren't fully mature and cocky at this age, and won't be until they are older. Lastly, when you keep several roosters, some roosters will not crow as much or act roosterish because they are subordinate roosters. Subordinate roosters don't like attracting the attention of the dominant male.

    In time, he should become more like a normal rooster. All birds develop at their own rates, and I wouldn't worry about him.
     

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