Brown pin speckles on brown eggs?

paloozaparty

Chirping
Apr 28, 2020
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These do not look like any spots on eggs that I'm finding online, to see if they're normal (am assuming so) and also to determine which pullet is laying them? We have 3, 18mo hens and are familiar with their eggs (tho not yet sure who lays which egg--all 3 are brown egg layers--one egg is always on the pink side, another one is way bigger than the others...) Anyway, we have 3 more, 5mo pullets (from our hen flock) and I'm almost positive that one or two are laying now (and that one or two hens are not/consistently now)... I also can't exactly figure out which pullet is from which hen either... anyway, there's been this 1 speckled egg consistently for about 10 days now--does anyone know what breed/s this egg is from and/or can confirm it's normal? I just read it could be too much calcium in diet, so I don't want to assume it's normal...
 

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Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
Feb 2, 2009
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I can't come up with any photos online that look like that either which makes me think it is so common it's not worth mentioning. I would not be concerned about that at all. I'm sure I've seen eggs like that and haven't even noticed it as different.

Breed has nothing to do with those spots. I think that's your question. Those spots are an individual hen thing, probably related to her shell gland.

If your question relates to the shade of brown, certain breeds are supposed to lay certain shades of brown, people are supposed to slow down in school zones, people are supposed to cover their mouth when they cough. A lot of things that are supposed to happen don't always. While a certain breed of chicken is supposed to ay a certain shade of brown egg in real life they often don't. A lot of that depends on whether the person selecting which chickens get to breed uses egg shell color and shade as a criteria. Not many do.

It's hard to tell which hen is laying which egg unless you catch her in the act. One method you might try since it is only three is to use food coloring. Put blue food coloring in one pullet's vent first thing in the morning, green in another, and yellow in the third. When you collect eggs look for colored streaks.

I've read you can do this with different colored lipstick too but I'm not going to explain to my wife why I'm putting lipstick on a hen's vent. Nope, not going there.
 

paloozaparty

Chirping
Apr 28, 2020
141
143
73
I can't come up with any photos online that look like that either which makes me think it is so common it's not worth mentioning. I would not be concerned about that at all. I'm sure I've seen eggs like that and haven't even noticed it as different.

Breed has nothing to do with those spots. I think that's your question. Those spots are an individual hen thing, probably related to her shell gland.

If your question relates to the shade of brown, certain breeds are supposed to lay certain shades of brown, people are supposed to slow down in school zones, people are supposed to cover their mouth when they cough. A lot of things that are supposed to happen don't always. While a certain breed of chicken is supposed to ay a certain shade of brown egg in real life they often don't. A lot of that depends on whether the person selecting which chickens get to breed uses egg shell color and shade as a criteria. Not many do.

It's hard to tell which hen is laying which egg unless you catch her in the act. One method you might try since it is only three is to use food coloring. Put blue food coloring in one pullet's vent first thing in the morning, green in another, and yellow in the third. When you collect eggs look for colored streaks.

I've read you can do this with different colored lipstick too but I'm not going to explain to my wife why I'm putting lipstick on a hen's vent. Nope, not going there.
THANK YOUUUU!!! In addition to your prompt and very reassuring/informational reply--i just laughed sooooo hard that tears are flying. Your food coloring idea is fantastic--you're a genius. And, for fun, I may tell my husband that HE has to put lipstick on their vents (one at a time of course)--if he falls for it, I'll be sure to post videos :) THANK YOU!!!
 

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
Feb 2, 2009
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I stole those food coloring and lipstick ideas from somebody on this forum years ago, I have no idea who or I'd give them credit. I can't take credit for those.

If you try it and get results, could you please post photos. It would be interesting to see them. I can only remember one other person ever doing that and posting photos.
 

paloozaparty

Chirping
Apr 28, 2020
141
143
73
I stole those food coloring and lipstick ideas from somebody on this forum years ago, I have no idea who or I'd give them credit. I can't take credit for those.

If you try it and get results, could you please post photos. It would be interesting to see them. I can only remember one other person ever doing that and posting photos.
I KNEW you'd say that you got those ideas from someone else--and how humble of you to want to pay tribute--but I'm giving you credit lol

Oh yes, absolutely--I'll definitely take pics and will share! I'm trying to figure out how to administer the dyes thru treats instead--but will resort to dropper-in-mouth method if I need to. I'm hoping not to step into colored poop and track all over haha
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
Nov 27, 2012
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My Coop
It's hard to tell which hen is laying which egg unless you catch her in the act. One method you might try since it is only three is to use food coloring. Put blue food coloring in one pullet's vent first thing in the morning, green in another, and yellow in the third. When you collect eggs look for colored streaks.
Yes, vent not mouth :gig and in the morning.

I have several birds that lay speckled eggs, I love them.

'Speckled' eggs can happen for several different reasons...very few, if any, of which are a 'problem'.
Can be caused by:
Excess or uneven pigment coating.
Excess or uneven cuticle(bloom).
Excess calcium deposits.
Porous eggs can appear speckled.
Some birds lay them consistently, some only once in awhile.
The pigment or bloom can change appearance when wet, then change back when dry again.

As long as bird is getting a good diet and is healthy in every other way, it is no cause for concern.
 

paloozaparty

Chirping
Apr 28, 2020
141
143
73
Yes, vent not mouth :gig and in the morning.

I have several birds that lay speckled eggs, I love them.

'Speckled' eggs can happen for several different reasons...very few, if any, of which are a 'problem'.
Can be caused by:
Excess or uneven pigment coating.
Excess or uneven cuticle(bloom).
Excess calcium deposits.
Porous eggs can appear speckled.
Some birds lay them consistently, some only once in awhile.
The pigment or bloom can change appearance when wet, then change back when dry again.

As long as bird is getting a good diet and is healthy in every other way, it is no cause for concern.
Thank youuuuuu!!!
 

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