brush turkey

De Wet

Songster
7 Years

collared brush turkey

black billed brush turkey

waigeo brush turkey


wattled brush turkey

It is very interesting how every continent contrubute in different galiformes for example
asia- ornametal pheasants andpeafowls
africa-francolins, guinea fowls and congo peafowls
australia- scrubfowls, malee fowls,megapodes and brush turkeys
north america- the grouse species and wild turkeys
south america- currasows and guans
europe- some patridge species

every continent have a contrubution on quails etc

but the most interesting is the australians species which incubated their eggs in humid leafs and malee fowls which used the warm ground of vulcano active enviroment to incubate their eggs and I wonder if some breeders have the knowledge to breed this birds in captivity.

here some pics of the brush turkey
australian brush turkey


waigeo brush turkey



red billed brush turkey



 
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casuarius

Songster
11 Years
Dec 21, 2009
307
24
186
NC
I've kept and bred Australian Brush Turkeys before, I sold out maybe 10-12 yrs ago, and now sadly they have disappeared in the US with the exception of a handful. They require extremely large pens, and cant be kept together outside of breeding season, the males are very aggressive towards females. I have been wanting to start breeding them again, but cant find any.
 

De Wet

Songster
7 Years
I've kept and bred Australian Brush Turkeys before, I sold out maybe 10-12 yrs ago, and now sadly they have disappeared in the US with the exception of a handful. They require extremely large pens, and cant be kept together outside of breeding season, the males are very aggressive towards females. I have been wanting to start breeding them again, but cant find any.
wow did they do the same nesting in captivity and must you provide all nesting materials?
 

De Wet

Songster
7 Years
I've kept and bred Australian Brush Turkeys before, I sold out maybe 10-12 yrs ago, and now sadly they have disappeared in the US with the exception of a handful. They require extremely large pens, and cant be kept together outside of breeding season, the males are very aggressive towards females. I have been wanting to start breeding them again, but cant find any.
I see on your profile pic a cassowarrie, do you breed them and is that true that is the most dangerous bird in the world?
 

casuarius

Songster
11 Years
Dec 21, 2009
307
24
186
NC
wow did they do the same nesting in captivity and must you provide all nesting materials?

Yes they do, and you have to provide lots and lots of mulch, dirt, leaves, etc. The male alone needs at least a 50ft by 50ft pen to build his mound, and he works on it year round constantly. The eggs are easy to artificially incubate, you just have to know the right temp and humidity. I think I kept the temp very low, around 91 degrees F, and the humidity was insanely high..around 85%. They dont need to be turned at all.
 

casuarius

Songster
11 Years
Dec 21, 2009
307
24
186
NC
I see on your profile pic a cassowarrie, do you breed them and is that true that is the most dangerous bird in the world?

Yes I have bred Cassowaries for 12 yrs now, and they are certainly the most dangerous bird if they want to be. There aren't enough left to work with, but I have found that their temper is in the genetics, and the more aggressive the bird, the better the survival and reproduction in the wild. Mild tempered Cassowaries breed poorly. I have a pair now that are very friendly, and they are horrible breeders. While they do reproduce, most of the eggs aren't fertile, because the male is as scared of the female as she is of him, and they jump and run during their mating act alot of times if the other bird moves wrong, causing him to waste his sperm. My friend has a particularly aggressive pair, and they produce 9+ fertile eggs each season, which is awesome for Cassowaries.
 

De Wet

Songster
7 Years
Yes I have bred Cassowaries for 12 yrs now, and they are certainly the most dangerous bird if they want to be. There aren't enough left to work with, but I have found that their temper is in the genetics, and the more aggressive the bird, the better the survival and reproduction in the wild. Mild tempered Cassowaries breed poorly. I have a pair now that are very friendly, and they are horrible breeders. While they do reproduce, most of the eggs aren't fertile, because the male is as scared of the female as she is of him, and they jump and run during their mating act alot of times if the other bird moves wrong, causing him to waste his sperm. My friend has a particularly aggressive pair, and they produce 9+ fertile eggs each season, which is awesome for Cassowaries.
very interesting birds, I read this bird is also like the emu the male incubate the eggs and rear the young...
 

bemba

Songster
9 Years
Feb 5, 2010
1,108
97
163
Mary Valley QLD.
I've kept and bred Australian Brush Turkeys before, I sold out maybe 10-12 yrs ago, and now sadly they have disappeared in the US with the exception of a handful. They require extremely large pens, and cant be kept together outside of breeding season, the males are very aggressive towards females. I have been wanting to start breeding them again, but cant f
I live in the heart of Brush turkey country, we have a male that has a mound across the road, the chicks emerge and hang around our aviaries scavenging for seed.
 

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