Calling The Guinea Experts, some Questions........

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by Mourningdove, Oct 23, 2009.

  1. Mourningdove

    Mourningdove Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 17, 2008
    Cleveland, Tn.
    Hello all,
    I have finally gotten me 6 keets [​IMG] They were hatched on or about
    Oct.8th, they are in my house under a heat lamp and are thriving well!
    I plan to transfer them outside about mid November thinking that once they are
    at least 6 weeks old they should be totally feathered and old enough.
    1st question is......... since I live in the south and on a mountain will they still need
    heat when I move them out?
    2nd question is....how soon can they be intergrated into my chicken flock?
    3rd question is.....at what age will they be before they are able to free range on
    their own?
    Forgive the questions but it's been many years since I have had guineas and I just
    want to do all this right! When they are allowed to free range I plan on them just roaming the property doing their thing! Thanks in advance for your input!
     
  2. kcardella

    kcardella Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 29, 2009
    Leslie, AR
    Congrats on your new babies!

    You will not need heat for them once they are feathered out, unless temps are below freezing. I put mine in the same area as my chickens when I move them outside, but separated by wire. This way, they can see/get used to each other, but the chickens cannot pick on the guineas (which they will do until the guineas are full grown). I keep them in that pen for 4-6 weeks to establish it as their home before letting them free range. You may also want to leave one or two in the pen when you first start letting them out, so the others will definitely stay close and come back.

    Good luck!
     
  3. Mourningdove

    Mourningdove Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 17, 2008
    Cleveland, Tn.
    Thanks for your input! I may just do it that way then [​IMG] So if I do it the way your suggesting does this mean by Feb or March they can begin free ranging? My yard is a
    tick and flea haven and I would like for the population to stay way down for a change.

    1 more question......I have an acere and a half of yard will just 6 guineas be enough? Or shall I plan to get more?
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2009
  4. Quote:I agree. These are the ages I go with:

    6 weeks: They can go to the coop in an enclosed area, seperated from the flock.
    8 weeks: They can start to be integrated in to the flock, two at a time.
    10 weeks: They can start free ranging, being used to the flock. BE SURE you leave most in the coop and only let a few out at a time. This way they tend to come back to the coop for roost.
    12 weeks: They can start being off feed and eat what the flock eats. (They require a high protein diet.)
    I take a small hanging feeder and fill it with 26 percent game bird every morning for the young Guineas. They do get their fill even though the rest of the flock eats from it. In the winter, I keep a large feeder going with 26 percent for all my Giuineas. They do not get enough bugs in the winter months for their protein needs.

    Guinea fowl are susceptable to desease in the winter months. The domesticated helmeted guinea fowl have become failrly adapt to the cold. Giving them plenty of protein and clean, fresh water EVERYDAY is very important.
     
  5. Mourningdove

    Mourningdove Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 17, 2008
    Cleveland, Tn.
    Quote:I agree. These are the ages I go with:

    6 weeks: They can go to the coop in an enclosed area, seperated from the flock.
    8 weeks: They can start to be integrated in to the flock, two at a time.
    10 weeks: They can start free ranging, being used to the flock. BE SURE you leave most in the coop and only let a few out at a time. This way they tend to come back to the coop for roost.
    12 weeks: They can start being off feed and eat what the flock eats. (They require a high protein diet.)
    I take a small hanging feeder and fill it with 26 percent game bird every morning for the young Guineas. They do get their fill even though the rest of the flock eats from it. In the winter, I keep a large feeder going with 26 percent for all my Giuineas. They do not get enough bugs in the winter months for their protein needs.

    Guinea fowl are susceptable to desease in the winter months. The domesticated helmeted guinea fowl have become failrly adapt to the cold. Giving them plenty of protein and clean, fresh water EVERYDAY is very important.

    Thank you both so very much for your input and suggestions here, I do seem to need to learn more about them. Where did I get an idea that they are as easy as chickens? hmmmm.......... Any and all advice is most welcomed!
     
  6. Aj1911

    Aj1911 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 4, 2009
    Keets cant handle real cold weather tell 12weeks old so they might need a heat lamp in the coop.
     
  7. Tailfeathers

    Tailfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,883
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    Dec 31, 2007
    Washington State
    I would add one - I believe - very important thing to consider when putting them outside so young during the Fall and Winter...

    If there is a chance that the temps will drop and the cold temp will be combine with any kind of wetness whatsoever, then I would recommend NOT doing so. The combination of any dampness and cold will create an ideal situation for hypothermia and it is deadly.

    God Bless,
     
  8. Quote:This is the biggest mistake one can make with Guineas. A wet, cold Guinea usually has a very bad outcome.

    You may notice that Guineas tend to stay indoors when it rains. Unlike chickens, they can not handle a soaking and cold temperatures.

    When your Keets begin to "call", then you have a good chance that they will be O.K. in the coop. Remember, 10 weeks is the VERY earliest to let them free range.

    Once an adult Guinea is going good, they usually take care of themselves becuase they RARELY go out without a few buds.

    Heat lamps are always good for Guineas at any age. The exoctic breeds MUST have a heated barn to live in for the winter. Something to think about.
     

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