Can I build run fencing without digging post holes?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by kathyinmo, Jun 11, 2009.

  1. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Can I build run fencing without digging post holes? I think not, because it would just be like a wall, and fall over, correct? Yes, I still plan to put an "apron," on bottom. The ground here in Missouri is like a rock with a little dirt sprinkled over it! I really can not dig post holes. All ideas and suggestions welcomed. Kathy
     
  2. crazy for chicken

    crazy for chicken Songster

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    Im going to build a run with out digging post holes We are going to frame it out with wood then fence it in with wire it is going to be in a L shape I will put up a pic, on when I get it done
     
  3. Zahboo

    Zahboo Simply Stated

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    You can build a 3 sided run and then bolt the 2 ends to your coop, it should stand...
     
  4. FrChuckW

    FrChuckW Father to all, Dad to none

    Sep 7, 2008
    Louisville, KY
    Quote:Kathy, yes you can build run fencing without digging holes. They make fence supports that can be either pounded in the ground with a mallet or have a spike on the end that you just push in the ground with your foot. I got mine at Tractor Supply. However, they only hold a fence about 4-5 feet tall. If you want taller fencing then you will have to build frames and then use cross beams to support them.
     
  5. jenjscott

    jenjscott Mosquito Beach Poultry

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    maybe you could drive fence posts. We used metal t shaped posts like you would use for barbed wire and drove them with a post driver. Won't go through rock, but will go through hard dirt and "rocky" ground, as long as you don't hit a big rock dead on. Or like I do with my big dog kennel fence. I had enough panels to make a run 30 x 40. I netted the top, which kept it from falling outward, then braced them from the inside to keep them from falling inwards. The larger the pen, the more bracing you're going to need.
     
  6. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Sure you can. That's what chainlink dog runs are, right? [​IMG] You can't make a postless run infinitely large -- depending on your engineering, a 20-25' side is about the most you can probably expect -- but in a pinch you could make L-shaped doglegs in a longer side to add stability.

    Basically you make solidly-framed panels, then attach them FIRMLY together at the corners WITH DIAGONAL HORIZONTAL BRACING so that they're locked into a 90 degree (or whatever degree) angle with the adjacent fence panel. That plus an apron will stand up to a whole lot.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  7. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Crowing

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    Quote:Mine is 12 X 18, built like a wall, and only attached at the coop end.
    I even built it laying on the ground, and put the wire on before standing it up

    No post holes, and a wide "apron " around the bottom

    There's one 2 X 4 running across the top to tie it together, and angle braces in the two front corners

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2009
  8. cw

    cw Songster

    Jan 11, 2009
    green co.
    i am cheking out the electric netting from premeire, u still have a small post to stick in the ground but dont go real far, like your ground ours is rocky to, i am thinkin of doin the premeir thing because its movable it would be like free ranging and a closed run at the same time,


    plus u dont have to dig a full blown fence post hole, and i think for the money u could have a larger run,
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2009
  9. sillybirds

    sillybirds Songster

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    Our soil here is very rocky too. Since our run is on a slope, I opted to use posts with concrete. After taking forever to dig a couple by hand with a pick and post-hole digger, I got smart and rented an electric jack-hammer from our local H.D. for about $50. I was able to dig all the holes in about half a day. If you do need to dig in rocky soil, this is the way to do it.
     
  10. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Thank you all. Now I have some great ideas. This weekend will be alot of work! Kathy
     

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