can I use 2x3s?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by elsiebb, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. elsiebb

    elsiebb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 10, 2013
    Oregon
    I am building a new, bigger coop for my growing flock. I am shamelessly copying todtrac's gorgeous design. Is there any reason why I should not use 2x3's instead of 2x4's for the walls and roof framing? I've used 4x4 posts and 2x4's for the floor framing. My run is made of 2x3's - just wondering if I could use 2x3's for the new henhouse. I'm in the Pacific Northwest, virtually no snow and just a couple of hard freezes a year, if that makes a difference. Thanks for your thoughts!
     
  2. Grey Roo

    Grey Roo Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 18, 2012
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    Some people's houses have 2X3 walls, so that should be fine. The 2X3's on the roof would probably be fine too, depending on how you plan to attach them. Using 2X4's on the roof would allow a little more room for any notches. I would still use 2X4's on the roof, even with that pitch. That's a pretty coop, have fun.
     
  3. dwgov

    dwgov Chillin' With My Peeps

    I've used 2x3's for everything primarily because of the cost. They worked just fine for me.
     
  4. elsiebb

    elsiebb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 10, 2013
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    Thanks for your help! Good to hear 2x3s will work. Now to find a way to lower the coat of those windows... Found the perfect transom windows online but they were $400 for the three I'll need! Since my coop is up against a fence on the north side I'm not putting windows on that aide. Thinking of building my own with plexiglass.
     
  5. fiddlebanshee

    fiddlebanshee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I did this. With the plexiglass, wood and screws it cost about $50 per window. They are approximately 3x3 ft.
     
  6. elsiebb

    elsiebb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 10, 2013
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    I found it very interesting that the transom window company sole both sash-only and ready to install versions. Sash only were about $135 per window. Ready to install were $250 per window. Then in their installation instructions for the sash-only version they said materials for completing the frame would run about $15. Just a little bit of markup there!
     
  7. dwgov

    dwgov Chillin' With My Peeps

    What I did was use chicken wire and some old door screen a framed it in 2x3's of course, haha. I used plywood to make covers that could be lifted & held up by chain. I can just let the flap down in colder weather. Pre fab windows were just to expensive for me.
     
  8. thomasboyle

    thomasboyle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 28, 2013
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    Check Craigslist for window sashes. I am restoring my barn, and have collected 15+ windows of all sizes and shapes mostly for free, or maybe $5-10 each. I prefer the old style single pane windows with individual window panes, as they have a classic look to them, and for an unheated barn or coop, they fit the bill nicely. Fixing broken panes is easy, and cheap, so even if you have to do some restoration, that's not an issue. I added windows to the coop's south facing main doors this winter, to allow light and heat in. Gave it a nice carriage house look. Those were free.

    I built my outdoor run with 4x4's for the posts, 2x6's for the rafters (spanning 16 feet) with a 2x6 support beam at the mid point and used 2x3's for everything else. My main reason for using 2x6's was to handle snowload, and that proved to be a good decision for this past winter where we regularly had 30+ inches on the roof at any given time.

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