Can you raise Eastern Wild Turkeys?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by kla37, Jun 29, 2010.

  1. kla37

    kla37 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't even know what they are really called, embarassing! I have chickens but I didn't know if it would be possible to raise wild turkeys. I live in the piedmont of NC, and don't see them much anymore! When I was younger, sometimes these wild birds would "adopt" people and hang out near them for months, sometimes years.
     
  2. Matt A NC

    Matt A NC Overrun With Chickens

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    Not here in NC. You have to apply for a game permit, but you will not get one. They have been denying all of them and will keep doing it. There was a problem a few years ago with folks in several parts of the state letting them loose along with other breeds that are not 'wild'. Once imprinting on humans and then released wild turkeys are classified as a nuisance.

    Matt
     
  3. kla37

    kla37 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for telling me! I'm just enjoying my chickens so much, I thought it might be fun to have a pet turkey too. Don't want to get into any trouble though!
     
  4. Matt A NC

    Matt A NC Overrun With Chickens

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    As long as you avoid the eastern wilds, you can have turkeys. I had pet Narragansett Tom till he fell in love with the dog and had to be rehomed. Been 3 years and I still miss my YoYo.

    Matt
     
  5. kla37

    kla37 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can you keep a turkey with chickens?
     
  6. gobblecluck

    gobblecluck Out Of The Brooder

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    people on here act like you should be sent to a federal penetentiary for raising turkeys with chickens for fear of blackhead but i raise my turkeys with my chickens and they seem perfectly happy. heck alot of people recommend putting a chick in with your newly hatched poults to teach them to eat and drink. i have never heard of anyone on here or otherwise having a case of blackhead so you should be safe but there is always that chance.
     
  7. Matt A NC

    Matt A NC Overrun With Chickens

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    YoYo wondered around with the chickens and at night slept with the standard Cochins.

    A friend down the road has a flock of Bourbon Reds with his chickens and they are fine as well.

    I know of very few who have blackhead in their flocks, but as long you don't you can keep chickens and turkeys together just fine.

    Matt
     
  8. kla37

    kla37 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hillsborough, NC USA
    I really am new! Didn't know what blackhead was! I can't get a turkey this year, but I'd like to get one next spring/summer. I have a HUGE coop that is supposed to house 15-20 chickens, but I only have nine, and I really don't want to increase that number since they have so much room and seem happy with it! Any suggestions for a breed of turkey friend to look at someday?
     
  9. pdpatch

    pdpatch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Black head is a poultry desiese that usually results in the turkey's dieing, where as with Chickens they can survive, but remains in the chickens. It usually happens in wet climate. It is passed via earth worm castings. Those that live in wet climates need to be more careful then others. You need to ask you local Ag Agency if there has been any reported out breaks in your area if not then the likely hood is slim, but always possible. Also if there has been no poultry on the land that the turkeys will be for the last 5 years the likely hood is slim.

    There are three main ways Blackhead moves between flocks. Through humans, new birds brought into your flock, and wild birds migrating through where your flock lives. I don't think there has been a reported case of Blackhead in the United States for some time.

    As long as they get a long you should have no problem, but you need to remember that Turkey poults and Chicken chicks have different nutritional requirements. So during the brooding of both it better to keep them separate.

    In any case you must monitor the health of your flock, the easiest way is to check there poop, it should be soft but solid most of the time. But is can be runny some times since they urinate through the cloaca also, but not all the time.

    Tom
     

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