Caponizing a rooster

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Hawsegal, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. Hawsegal

    Hawsegal Out Of The Brooder

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    I hope this is the right section to post in, lol.

    So I've been reading up on caponizing a rooster. He's a bit older though, almost full grown. I know that surgical caponization is risky but I have also read that there is an injection that can do the same as the procedure? I have no intentions of eating this rooster, however...I am interested in making "he" an "it".

    I guess I just don't want his little extra ingredient in the eggs, lol. That and no little chickies (as cute as they are). He is my boyfriends favorite bird (go figure) so I can't quite get rid of him and I don't see it as fair to pen him up while the others roam free. Up till now I have been an "all girl" facility...till Mt Healthy hatchery slipped me a boy [​IMG]

    I can't figure out where I can get the injection to sterilize him, or even what it is. There is so little info on it that I am hoping someone here can give me a bit of help [​IMG]
     
  2. yomama

    yomama Overrun With Chickens

    I don't have any info in regards to a sterilization drug for him, but why would you need to. If you collect the eggs on a regular basis, they won't develop. I have one rooster that has his way with most of my hens. I don't want to hatch out any babies, so we don't let any of the hens set on them. I collect eggs about twice a day, but even once a day would be fine. However, if it is the thought of eating a fertilized egg that bothers you, then I guess sterilization might be the way to go. I have to say, the thought kind of bothered me too at first. Not sure why. I don't even eat eggs, other than using them for baking and what not. My husband and kids do, but not me. But do to the fact that I collect early and often, most of the time you can't even tell they are fertilized, unless you really know what you are looking for.
     
  3. Hawsegal

    Hawsegal Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:More of a subconscious thing...like eating chicken nuggets or hotdogs...once you know whats in there it kinda gives you the gags to eat it afterwards,lol.
     
  4. yomama

    yomama Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:More of a subconscious thing...like eating chicken nuggets or hotdogs...once you know whats in there it kinda gives you the gags to eat it afterwards,lol.

    That's true! [​IMG]
     
  5. Hawsegal

    Hawsegal Out Of The Brooder

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    Ive found a bit more info with chemical caponization...oestrogen pellets injected under the neck skin. However I have not found a strength/weight chart or even how long each injection will last. I have no intentions of eating him so chemicals are ok with me. I just wish there was a bit more info on the topic x.x

    I'm having my vet look into it as he would rather do the injections over the invasive surgery anyways [​IMG]
     
  6. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    To each his/her own. Why on earth do you have a rooster if you don't absolutely don't want fertilized eggs? If you don't have a rooster, there's usually a dominant hen to take over the Keep Watch role.

    I love my rooster(s) and there's a lot going for them other than fertilizing eggs, but the amount of aversion you write about makes me wonder why you are keeping one at all. And to go through the cost of chemically sterilizing a rooster to keep him from fertilizing eggs?

    As has already been mentioned, you would never, ever taste the difference between fertile and non-fertile eggs, because there IS NO DIFFERENCE. No flavor change, no change in nutritional analysis. If someone is experiencing gag-reflex action at the thought of rooster sperm inside an eggshell, trust me, there's not a little pocket of chicken sperm tucked into that egg. That's not how it works.

    Oh well. I'm curious about this, so please do post the information as you learn it from your vet. I do wish to understand.
     
  7. Hawsegal

    Hawsegal Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:I didn't get him willingly, he came to me as a"hatchery sexed hen" along with my 11 other girls. Since then he has grown on us, a pet more than any. I would rather pay the money and have him sterilized than give him to another home and not know whether he is to become dumplings or not. At all costs when I take on an animal I care for them until their (natural) deaths as I believe that they did not ask to become my pet therefore it is my responsibility to care for them thusly so.

    I have also developed a level of comfort knowing that I had all hens. No saddle sores, no bald heads...etc. But as previously mentioned he is in my care and therefore I will do what is necessary. Last resort I will build him a pen, but with winters being so cold (and with me having bantams which I dont want a buff orpington mounting) I am willing to go the extra mile. This coming from the person who paid well over $5000 during the life of her $24 rabbit to keep it well.

    The vet is looking into the oestrogen method, as he has other animals taking it and sees it as a way to further his knowledge on treatments. I will post as things progress.
     
  8. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    Loxahatchee, Florida
    Here's a whole big long discussion on surgical caponization, be warned, there are graphic photos & descriptions there. On page 20, post #197, there is some discussion on chemical caponization (NOT recommended). https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=2489274 Most birds are caponized in order to make them grow meatier for the table. I wouldn't try to do it on an almost-grown rooster, it's usually done by 9-10 weeks.

    I agree that it's no big deal to eat fertilized eggs, there is no difference in taste and only a tiny dot of difference in appearance (not a blood spot). But if you don't want him wearing the feathers off your hens then go ahead & keep him penned separately. He'll get accustomed to it, and won't call his lawyer or accuse you of being "unfair". You could even give him recess at times your hens are penned, & vice versa.
    And, of course, [​IMG]
     
  9. Hawsegal

    Hawsegal Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 13, 2010
    Quote:The more I wear on the subject the more I'm thinking of making a bachelor pad. I don't want to risk the little boogers life but as said...well...I have my boy bits in eggs and sore hens issue,lol. Ah poo *fist shake at hatchery* I guess it's time for a jaunt to the coop plan section and a trip to tractor supply. Gah. On top of this all I am treating 7 little pairs of feet for bumblefoot. Whoever said patience is a virtue didn't own the equivilent of a "unwanted" petting zoo. (I take in what my friends "don't want anymore" so they can live out life comfortably)

    If I DO hear back from my vet I will still try to post on what I find out. Thanks for your help guys [​IMG]

    ...Gotta watch those chickens though. He may not call a lawyer but could very well land me a sound peck when I least expect it,lol!
     
  10. Yamaha1300

    Yamaha1300 New Egg

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    Nov 26, 2013
    Does caponizing a rooster quiet him down any? Or, is there no effect etc...
     

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