Cecal Worms

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Rose95, Aug 22, 2015.

  1. Rose95

    Rose95 Out Of The Brooder

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    In the last week and a half I have treated my 3 birds with Wazine and given an oral broad spectrum parasiticide Interceptor (Milbamycin Oxime) given to me by a veterinarian. It has been 8 days since the Interceptor was given and today I see worms in Cecal poop again! I read that they dont cause any known harm to Chickens so is this something I really need to retreat for?? :(
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Milbamycin is used in dogs and cats for control of roundworms, whip worms, and hookworms as well as heartworm. I have no idea if it gets cecal worms in chickens. Wazine sure doesn't control anything but round worms. Fenbendazaole (SafeGauard, Panacur) 1 ml for 3 days in a row will kill cecal worms in chickens. Cecal worms can carry the organism that causes blackhead in turkeys, and rarely, chickens. I sure wish Dawg53 could see this post, since he is an expert on worms in chickens. Here is a link about worms: https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vm015
     
  3. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    Cecal worms are one of the most common worms in chickens, right behind round worms.

    I agree Wazine is only effective against round worms, and the other poster was correct about Milbamycin from what I read.

    Worms are ever present in chickens and their environment...which is why it is important to keep their litter clean and rotate their field as much as possible to prevent, as much as possible, worm build up in the soil.

    You won't see worms unless there is an overload. It is important to prevent an overload as they can easily drain the bird's immune system and overall health, slowing laying substantially and allowing the bird to be susceptible to disease...and yes some, like cecal worms, can harbor nasty disease.

    Fenbendazole is effective against a broad spectrum of worms in poultry. You would need to treat then treat again in 7 to 10 days to break the worm cycle of adults and eggs. If you use paste, it can be helpful to put it into a pocket of bread and feed each bird individually...raspberries are especially effective way of treating birds as they tend to gobble them up easily. Liquid form in the water is especially effective.

    Be aware that fenbendazole is not FDA approved for laying hens in the USA (or UK). Vets can prescribe it off label, but technically, you would never be able to sell eggs from those birds, ever. If the eggs are for family use, no worries. If you sell them, you may need to consider if you desire to be within FDA approval.

    Typically egg pull time is recommended at 10 to 14 days after last treatment.

    Hygromycin B is FDA approved and is effective against round, cecal, and capillary worms in chickens. It is a feed based med (pellets applied to the feed). Industry offers it in continuous feed, but the company recommends feeding seasonally or monthly for 2 to 4 weeks. I have seen studies that recommend 6 weeks for cecal worms, however, I note much improvement after 2 weeks and worm 2 to 3 times a year.

    Hygromycin B has no pull time for the eggs, per FDA regulation, as studies show it does not transfer to the eggs well.

    If you choose Hygromycin B, you can get it too at the feed store in the form of Durvet Strike III or Rooster Booster Triple Action Multi Wormer. Rooster Booster also contains vitamins/minerals and probiotics which give the bird a nice boost as well.

    In between worming, I like to support gut health and the immune system, the bird's first defense against worms, by adding Apple Cider Vinegar in the water (1 TB per gallon, raw, unfiltered, with mother, plastic containers only), and offering yogurt with pumpkin seeds and cayenne pepper and garlic. That helps the bird flush worms, but does not kill the worms so keeping clean litter is essential. That helps keep worm loads down between worming with meds, and helps reduce the need for meds.

    LofMc
     
  4. Rose95

    Rose95 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you so much for your concise reply! So helpful!! I do provide Water with Garlic and Braggs ACV. I will go to the feed store tomorrow to fund Hygromycin B! As a side note I scoop poop EVRY DAY. in the last 6 weeks I have 2x s done a complete change of Coop and run bedding. I sanitized completely one of those times feeders! Water ... dug out several inches of Run dirt and replace with new and incorporated DE. I had 4 Chickens and lost one to either Peritonitis or Egg Lash Obstruction (judging by the size of the abdominal mass she had been that way for some time). All this in addition to worms. This has been the most dreadful first time Chicken experience ever. Thank you again for your reply!
     
  5. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    Glad it was helpful.

    If you get sticker shock at the feed store...I get my Rooster Booster here: http://www.abetterchicken.com/product/50101

    Durvet Strike III tends to be cheapest, but I often like to get the RB as it has those nice vitamins/minerals/probiotics too.

    And don't forget Amazon...I've picked up some good deals on those wormers there.

    I bet I can beat your "worst" chicken start up story...our first flock...we burned to the ground at 5 months of age when one of the newly transferred birds knocked down the flood lamp we had put in during a very cold snap as they were still transitioning to the outdoor coop. They had just started laying. Burned the coop down to ash pit to the ground, not a stick left standing, burned the extension cord (brand new, fully rated) halfway back to the house, blew the fuse. Nobody saw anything or heard anything during the night, burned faces of trees, but did not set off the wood pile, ours or neighbors. It must have gone up like a roman candle between midnight and 7am...all that was left was smoldering ash the next morning at 8:30 when I went out to check on the chickens. THAT was a bad start up...but here I am 6 years later with a vibrant flock about to start a breeding program.

    Having chickens is like tending a garden, there is always something to do, always something to fight, always something to learn....if you enjoy it; it will be very rewarding....especially as those silly little raptors entertain you with their antics and please you with their beautiful eggs.

    Wishing your flock the best.
    LofMc
     
  6. Rose95

    Rose95 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh gosh! That is a sad story! :(
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    I would recommend the fenbendazole (Safeguard) 1 ml orally treatment for 3 days in a row, since you have seen a worm infestation. Later you could try the hygromycin B or Strike III, but with an outbreak it would be best to treat it agressively. Valbazen could also be used instead 1/2 ml orally and repeat in 10 days. Here are many threads about cecal worms to read if you wish: https://www.backyardchickens.com/newsearch?search=cecal+worms
     
  8. sophiaw00

    sophiaw00 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  9. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes as the med Hygromycin B in those products is currently the only FDA approved wormer for laying hens. If you sell eggs, you technically cannot use anything off label and sell eggs from that hen, ever. You would not be organic with using Hygromycin B, but you can sell as farm fresh hormone, antibiotic free.

    My research shows that for cecal worms you need to feed Hygromycin B for 6 continuous weeks as those are harder to rid.

    LofMc
     
  10. LogCabinChicks

    LogCabinChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The directions on the bag and everywhere on the internet do not give a time frame for dosing. I have a flock of 120-- that would be $629 over the 6 weeks period -- can you point me to the research? I must use it, as my turkeys got blackhead from the chickens.... [​IMG]
     

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