Cedar Shavings For Nesting Boxes?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by 7girlsandaroo, Nov 11, 2012.

  1. 7girlsandaroo

    7girlsandaroo Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 9, 2012
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    I was just reading on another site that Cedar Shavings are great for Nesting Boxes as the cedar aroma lessons the likelihood of mites. I thought cedar shavings were a no no for poultry? I use low-dust pine shavings in the coop and nesting boxes. Anyone have experience with cedar shavings?
     
  2. 15shenyl

    15shenyl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use cedar shavings in my nest boxes and on the ground in there coop. It really makes everything smell good. I have never had mites before, so I don't know. My chickens really love the cedar. I tried to use straw because I ran out of cedar, they laid there eggs out side. I love cedar, it also makes cleaning out everything a lot easer.
     
  3. nuts4hotwheels

    nuts4hotwheels Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would never use cedar with any animal. Cedar has volatile compounds which give it the aroma. Unfortunately these compounds have been implicated as a potential health risk, especially with regards to respiratory problems (asthma, inflammation, allergic responses) and changes in the liver in many animals. I worked at a pet store many years ago and people come in and complain that there mouse, gerbil, hamster etc. died after a few days and we would ask them about the bedding. Many people lost pets due to using cedar bedding.

    Pine has similar volatile compounds but not in high levels. The safest wood shavings to use wood probably be aspen. I have done a lot of online research on this issue because I have had many animals that I have cared for.
     
  4. newbietochicks

    newbietochicks New Egg

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    Nov 11, 2012
    I live in redwood country. Would there be any problems using redwood mulch on the coop floor. The floor is made from redwood 2x6 lumber.
     
  5. 7girlsandaroo

    7girlsandaroo Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks, I am rather skeptical about using cedar due to potential respiratory problems with the girls. I think I'll continue using low-dust pine shavings with a little D.E. sprinkled in. If others have had good luck with cedar I guess stick with what works, but I believe you are right-on with the caution.
     
  6. 15shenyl

    15shenyl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I really don't see how the shavings are so bad. I get the stuff Thad been dried and no dust. If they ever have problems, I will switch, but I know people who had chickens that lived with cedar for 15 years, it was fine. Not to sound bad. If they start having problems, I will do something, but for now I'm leaving it.
     
  7. 7girlsandaroo

    7girlsandaroo Out Of The Brooder

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    Hmmmmmmmmmmm! Perhaps I will give it a try. Thanks for your input.
     
  8. popsicle

    popsicle Chillin' With My Peeps

    I've read that when cedar gets wet it gives off oils/compounds that are toxic to chickens and other animals.
     
  9. 15shenyl

    15shenyl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How about non treated, dust free shavings. Not raw shavings. That is what we use, is that ok?
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2012
  10. JacobMaxwell

    JacobMaxwell Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've been using cedar for almost a year now with no problems. It's probably because I have a very well ventilated chicken tractor. If you decide to use cedar, just make sure there's LOTS of ventilation.
     

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