Cerebral Palsy???

Discussion in 'Family Life - Stories, Pictures & Updates' started by RoosterRehab97, Dec 29, 2009.

  1. RoosterRehab97

    RoosterRehab97 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Anyone know anything about it, or anyone that have it??? I'd like to see if I'm in good company.
     
  2. Buff Hooligans

    Buff Hooligans Scrambled

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    Quote:My hubby's 39 year old daughter has it, but very severely, from birth (cord around her neck).
    She can't talk, walk, move too much, etc.

    I'm thinking you are in much better condition! Hugs to you!
     
  3. RoosterRehab97

    RoosterRehab97 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:My hubby's 39 year old daughter has it, but very severely, from birth (cord around her neck).
    She can't talk, walk, move too much, etc.

    I'm thinking you are in much better condition! Hugs to you!

    Ouch, I'm lucky. Though I barely survived birth, I'm near fine except for slight mental retardation, and muscle spasms.
     
  4. Buff Hooligans

    Buff Hooligans Scrambled

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    Quote:I've heard they can be awfully painful. I hope the meds make them less awful.
     
  5. RoosterRehab97

    RoosterRehab97 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:I've heard they can be awfully painful. I hope the meds make them less awful.

    Thanks, I got Botox injections today so the muscles loosen.
     
  6. organicfoltzfamilyfarm

    organicfoltzfamilyfarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What do you mean by metal retardation? One of my best friends in middle school had it. He couldn't walk, talk, or function properly. But we would play together with balloons. He loved them so I would bring them on the bus and we would pass them back and fourth(well he would try to and as the years went on he got really good at it). He was older than me but you couldn't tell it.

    Blessings to you!
     
  7. Buff Hooligans

    Buff Hooligans Scrambled

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    Quote:Wow, a REAL honest-to-good use for Botox! I wonder if Jenny's doctors have tried that. They mostly give her anti-spasmotic pills.
    Remarkably enough she has a very high tolerance for pain, I mean, she can take levels of pain that would make a grown man cry.
    She indicates her "comfort level" by shifting her eyeballs right or left for yes or no.

    Do you have a high tolerance for pain?
     
  8. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    I have many issues related to a difficult birth. My mom's uterus ruptured, leaving me trapped and without oxygen. The forceps used to release me crushed my skull on the right side. I have some brain damage in the right temporal lobe and a spine that is deformed from the lumber region down.
    Despite this, I am able to function fairly well.
    My heart goes out to you.
    I too wish you many blessings. [​IMG]
     
  9. Shannon's Chix

    Shannon's Chix Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My 7 year old nephew has CP. He's had spasticity in his lower body since birth. Mentally he is fine. He uses a walker. A few years back had an "experimental" spinal surgery where the cut most of the nerves going to the legs and feet, the idea was his muscles would then loosen up...it didn't work.
     
  10. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    I am familiar with it as I have known people with it. But, I haven't dealt with it directly in my family.

    Kinda off-topic, yet related (I found this interesting and would like to share). There was a show on the health discovery channel the other day that was explaining how some (few, but nonetheless some) of the cerebral palsy diagnoses are really a condition called Dystonia, a condition that causes a dopamine deficiency. It was really interesting. The doctor was explaining that with Cerebral Palsy, the symptoms aren't progressive (you can't get worse), but with the dystonia the person has regressive behavior (more and more difficulty walking, talking, etc). It was really interesting. The show was about twins that were diagnosed with cerebral palsy, but found out about this rare (and recently discovered?) condition that can be treated with dopamine drugs. I found it fascinating. Looking online, I found several articles discussing dopamine therapy for cerebral palsy, but I am not sure if it is because they really have dystonia or if it is also a helpful treatment for cerebral palsy.
     

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