Chick with scissor beak and one eye

Kjleiker

In the Brooder
Jul 18, 2021
10
15
26
I had a a chick born with a scissor beak and one eye, what do I do?
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Kjleiker

In the Brooder
Jul 18, 2021
10
15
26
I know that I might have to cult him, but I'm going to give him a few days. I want him to have a chance.
 

K0k0shka

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
Jul 24, 2019
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This is a severe scissor beak, its chances aren't good. Some people can make it work, but when the scissor is not this bad. And it tends to get worse with time. At this level of handicap you may need to feed it by hand, potentially forever. Up to you whether you want that kind of investment. Not easy to do if you work outside the home or have other things to do than hand-feed this chicken multiple times a day every day forever. It won't be able to do regular chicken things like foraging or preening either, so it will have a low quality life either way. Some people like to keep all kinds of disabled animals because they believe the animal doesn't notice and that any life is worth living. That's a personal opinion and decision. Obviously we can't ask the chicken, but if you were unable to do most things that your species does, and lived a life of frustration, would it really be worth it? A chicken can't derive higher meaning from this, the way disabled people and their communities can. Disabled people have walking canes, hearing aids, feeding tubes and all kinds of technology to give them access to doing normal human things. This chicken will have nothing to help it do chicken things, aside from you hand feeding it. It can't sit back and reflect on how diversity of ability enriches the human community by teaching others compassion. All it will know in its life is frustration in trying to do things its instincts are pushing it to do, but its body cannot manage. To me personally, that's not a life worth living. The more compassionate thing to do would be to put the poor thing down. If the scissor wasn't so severe, it could've managed on its own maybe, but this one is too far gone. This is just one opinion though. Think about it and make a decision with the chicken's reality in mind, not just with what would make you feel good to do (saving a life feels good, but isn't always the most compassionate decision).
 

Kjleiker

In the Brooder
Jul 18, 2021
10
15
26
This is a severe scissor beak, its chances aren't good. Some people can make it work, but when the scissor is not this bad. And it tends to get worse with time. At this level of handicap you may need to feed it by hand, potentially forever. Up to you whether you want that kind of investment. Not easy to do if you work outside the home or have other things to do than hand-feed this chicken multiple times a day every day forever. It won't be able to do regular chicken things like foraging or preening either, so it will have a low quality life either way. Some people like to keep all kinds of disabled animals because they believe the animal doesn't notice and that any life is worth living. That's a personal opinion and decision. Obviously we can't ask the chicken, but if you were unable to do most things that your species does, and lived a life of frustration, would it really be worth it? A chicken can't derive higher meaning from this, the way disabled people and their communities can. Disabled people have walking canes, hearing aids, feeding tubes and all kinds of technology to give them access to doing normal human things. This chicken will have nothing to help it do chicken things, aside from you hand feeding it. It can't sit back and reflect on how diversity of ability enriches the human community by teaching others compassion. All it will know in its life is frustration in trying to do things its instincts are pushing it to do, but its body cannot manage. To me personally, that's not a life worth living. The more compassionate thing to do would be to put the poor thing down. If the scissor wasn't so severe, it could've managed on its own maybe, but this one is too far gone. This is just one opinion though. Think about it and make a decision with the chicken's reality in mind, not just with what would make you feel good to do (saving a life feels good, but isn't always the most compassionate decision).
Thank you, that's I what I will probably be doing, his quality of life won't be very good.
 

rosemarythyme

Scarborough Fair
6 Years
Jul 3, 2016
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Think about it and make a decision with the chicken's reality in mind, not just with what would make you feel good to do (saving a life feels good, but isn't always the most compassionate decision).
x2.

In addition I think it's more than just a missing eye or a crossbeak - the skull looks misshapen as well, which means possible brain damage as well.
 

Peck peck

Chirping
Oct 30, 2019
40
57
74
I had a a chick born with a scissor beak and one eye, what do I do? View attachment 2767697 View attachment 2767698 View attachment 2767699
I would give it a chance at life! If it has a really hard time eating I would cull sometimes you have to think of quality of life, but just to prove it is possible to keep a scissor beak chicken.This is Sizzy she is now one year one months old and is happy and healthy. She can eat by herself for the most part. I sometimes take their feed and mix it with water to make a mash to make it easier for her to eat, and I do have to trim her beak but it is possible to keep disabled chickens. She also has a best friend called munchkin she has a deformed leg and in the past had lots of health issues. But is now doing the best she has ever been! Im not sure what to do about the eye though.
 

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