Chicken Breed Focus - Aseel/Asil

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by sumi, Nov 12, 2015.

  1. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    @Uzair Ahmed I think "difficult" compared to the average backyard breeds, I understand Aseels need a bit more management and know-how.

    I'm trying to picture those like-Aseel-Silkies… I'm having this crazy mental image of some active, aggressive little fluff balls [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2015
  2. JRNash

    JRNash Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm going to have to agree with ridgerunner's assessment. These are not a breed that tolerates any competition from other chickens. They were bred to fight, and they do so with a passion,much to my consternation. I do not believe it's possible to socialize Lucky with other chickens. At least not until the urge to mate HOPEFULLY overcomes the urge to fight
     
  3. prariechiken

    prariechiken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One of my asil hens laid and set a clutch of eggs one December... the middle of winter. I was going to toss the eggs, but decided it didn't hurt leaving them in there and tossing them out as they froze. Well she hatched out 5 chicks for Christmas and raised them all to adulthood. Excellent mothers is an understatement. Have had hens that set and raised 3 clutches of chicks over the summer... nothing funnier then seeing an asil momma try to cover a half grown Thai chick on the roost :) . Great personalities, and while they do take some extra care, the rewards far outweigh the extra work required to raise them.

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  4. JRNash

    JRNash Overrun With Chickens

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    As long as I'm raising chickens,there will be an asil in the mix. They really have a lot to offer
     
  5. Akrnaf2

    Akrnaf2 The educated Rhino Premium Member

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    The name of this breed comes from the arabic word Asil' أصيل which means " pure bred" this breed as a history of 3000 year of domestication, and in fact it is the first domesticated breed of chickens! The meaning of that is that the Asil is the first breed of the species Gallus gallus domesticus which have been derived from,according to the common convention,from the Red jungle fowl,Gallus gallus.
     
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  6. N F C

    N F C doo be doo be doo Premium Member Project Manager

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    Interesting comments on this breed.

    @sumi thanks for starting the focus on them, it gives me a chance to learn more about a breed I've never thought of raising before.
     
  7. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    You're welcome, Debby. I am also enjoying this thread as I've been fascinated with Aseels for awhile and I'm enjoying learning more about them.
     
  8. cubalaya

    cubalaya Overrun With Chickens

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    there are several 'types' of asil: ghan which includes the Pakistani, khan, mianwalli. the sonatols. the kaptans which include the cobra. the rumpas which includes the rampuri, the hyderabadi, the sindi
     
  9. cubalaya

    cubalaya Overrun With Chickens

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    also some classify them by size: the kulang, the reza, and the madras.
    mine are reza for size and ghan type
     
  10. varidgerunner

    varidgerunner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The study of Asil is very fascinating. We have left out the Hint Horoz, considered the Turkish Asil. They get big. As for big birds, I have read and seen pictures of a bird raised in India that was reported to stand 27 inches from the ground to the tip of his beak and weighed a staggering 22 pounds as a six year old brood cock. His legs looked like shovel handles. I know of people working on Bantam Asil, as well.

    I don't know what the APA standard for Asil says exactly, but from what I have heard, it would exclude 3/4 of all Asil in the world and maybe that many in the US. From what I remember it describes an Atkinson Asil.

    Eye color is a big deal to old world breeders, as well as beak and leg color. From what I can read many prefer the pearl legs. The shanks should be square, not round. Combs should be tight and wattles almost non existent, in the types not having straight comb. They should have a distinctive short crow.
     

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