Chicken with a wheezing cough , second one now sounding sick.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by EggNoob, Nov 6, 2010.

  1. EggNoob

    EggNoob Out Of The Brooder

    Bard rock Hen. Have had her 2 months not sure of her age. No recent flock additions. No Previous signs of Illness. I observe chickens daily. This is first symptom I have seen. coop cleaned yesterday as it is weekly, new hay placed down. This morning slow to get off the roost, picking but seems listless. Has a cough. has a wheeze when you listen to her breathing. No signs or symptoms in any of the others. Have a total flock of 12 hens and a Rooster. Big-ish coop, 40' x 40' open air yard.. so over crowding is not an issue. Well fed.. I make them oat meal for breakfast every morning. Really hate to have to cull her out.. has a name and everything. Anyone have a suggestion?

    Update.. Have put her in isolation.. appears to have hemoptasis (coughing blood)

    Barred Rock (Priss) is still hanging in there eating a little and not coughing as much, now a second hen, a Golden Comet ( Eggs) is having raspy breathing but no coughing. Treating the whole flock with tetracycline. If a second one is showing s/s of a resp. infection, thinking the whole coop has been exposed. The sick one and one who might be getting, sick came from the same farm. They were purchased as adults as this is our first foray into the chicken farming thing. They were supposed to be test/learning chickens but have quickly become loved pets.. with little wonderous orb benefits.
    No signs of any problems over the previous 2 months that we have had them. No exposure to any other poultry either. Is it just coincidence that the respiratory ailment started with our first really cold nights? Coop is not drafty but has ventilation. Could this be something that they carry? Is it common for resp. problems with the change of the season? Am trying to research. All I am finding is talking about vaccinations. I am looking more for treatments.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2010
  2. WiscoChiko

    WiscoChiko Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 19, 2010
    Portage county WI
    Isolate her from the rest of the flock ASAP. I am new to chickens, But to put her in a dog carrier or box in the house to watch her IMO would be the best idea, you dont want it spreading. Hopefully some of the more knowledgable members will be of more help...
    And feeding some good plain organic yougurt is a great thing! Maybe some electrolytes in her water. Wisco
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2010
  3. MMPoultryFarms

    MMPoultryFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 21, 2010
    Okarche Oklahoma
    More then likely its due to the weather changing so much hot in the day Cold at night. Don't panic just yet. Giveher some VetRX Just rub it all over the combs waddles 1 drop under each wing. and perhaps 1 shot of tylan-50 injectable. about 1/2 cc for her age. if it doesnt clear up continue the tylan 50 for 2 additional days.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2010
  4. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044

    Here
    is a common poultry diseases webpage...I don't know how to advise you though! Here is a sample from the page:

    Clinical signs: The clinical sign usually first noticed is watery eyes. Affected birds remain quiet because breathing is difficult. Coughing, sneezing, and shaking of the head to dislodge exudate plugs in the windpipe follow. Birds extend their head and neck to facilitate breathing (commonly referred to as "pump handle respiration"). Inhalation produces a wheezing and gurgling sound. Blood-tinged exudates and serum clots are expelled from the trachea of affected birds. Many birds die from asphyxiation due to a blockage of the trachea when the tracheal plug is freed (see Table 1 ).

    http://www.shagbarkbantams.com/laryng.htm
    http://www.shagbarkbantams.com/contents.htm

    Also, I have NO experience with respiratory disease in chickens. Just have some bookmarked pages to share.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2010

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