1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

chicks loosing weight then dieing

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ericmcginn5, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. ericmcginn5

    ericmcginn5 Chillin' With My Peeps

    375
    3
    91
    Apr 2, 2013
    so i have tryed chicks lots of times and im having a problem at about 3 months on about every batch chicks start getting weak then loose lots of weight and dieing this is of cource before i start deworming them. is it a worm problem? should i start dewormer earlier? if so what age? i never have this problem with my adult birds. plz help
     
  2. beb444

    beb444 Chillin' With My Peeps

    221
    12
    63
    Nov 16, 2015
    Northern CA
    It could be coccidiosis.... I would try putting cord in their water, it doesn't hurt them if they don't have it. I will post some good URL's for dealing with coccidiosis

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1072273/white-watery-poop

    There is a lot of good info on there^^ it ended up not being coccidiosis, but it has some really great info
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016
  3. ericmcginn5

    ericmcginn5 Chillin' With My Peeps

    375
    3
    91
    Apr 2, 2013
    what is cord you said you would put it in there watter?
     
  4. beb444

    beb444 Chillin' With My Peeps

    221
    12
    63
    Nov 16, 2015
    Northern CA
    I'm sorry! I meant corid. You can buy it at feed stores or amazon.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016
  5. ericmcginn5

    ericmcginn5 Chillin' With My Peeps

    375
    3
    91
    Apr 2, 2013
    ok that makes more sence lol well next time i get chicks i will def put some in watter if they start loosing weight. also when should u first deworm chicken with safeguard?
     
  6. Woobsie

    Woobsie Chillin' With My Peeps

    189
    22
    88
    Jun 8, 2013
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Coccidiosis is obvious through blood in the poop. Corid creates a thiamine deficiency which causes the coccidiosis parasite to die. Corid should be mixed at the dosing rate on the package and provided as the only source of drinking fluid for a few days. You should see signs of improvement within a couple days and poo should be blood free after a few. If there is no blood in the poop it's unlikely to be coccidiosis. Also many brands of chick starter have a Corid type drug mixed in the feed. Check to make sure they aren't already eating medicated feed. If they have been this whole time it is extremely unlikely to be coccidiosis.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016
  7. Woobsie

    Woobsie Chillin' With My Peeps

    189
    22
    88
    Jun 8, 2013
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Corid is available in store at Tractor Supply in a silver bag
     
  8. Woobsie

    Woobsie Chillin' With My Peeps

    189
    22
    88
    Jun 8, 2013
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Coccidiosis is obvious through blood in the poop. Corid creates a thiamine deficiency which causes the coccidiosis parasite to die. Corid should be mixed at the dosing rate on the package and provided as the only source of drinking fluid for a few days. You should see signs of improvement within a couple days and poo should be blood free after a few. If there is no blood in the poop it's unlikely to be coccidiosis. Also many brands of chick starter have a Corid type drug mixed in the feed. Check to make sure they aren't already eating medicated feed. If they have been this whole time it is extremely unlikely to be coccidiosis.
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Poop Inspector General Premium Member

    53,709
    5,591
    618
    Jun 24, 2012
    Lots to comment on her regarding Corid and coccidiosis...

    1) Feeding medicated feed is no guarantee that your chicks won't get coccidiosis.
    2) Not all chicks with coccidiosis will have bloody poop.
    3) Sometmes bloody poop is not coccidiosis.
    4) The Corid dose for chickens is *not* the same as the cattle dose. The correct dose is:

    Severe outbreak dose is no less than 1.5 teaspoons per gallon for five days, then ~1/3 teaspoon per gallon for 7-14 days.

    Moderate outbreak dose is no less than 3/4 teaspoons per gallon for five days, then ~1/3 teaspoon per gallon for 7-14 days.

    Most people give the severe dose amount.

    -Kathy
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by